Ja beat Guyana by five wickets

first_imgMANDEVILLE, Jamaica (CMC):Jamaica defeated Guyana by five wicketsin the opening roundof the Regional Under-19 Championship at Manchester High Schoolyesterday.Scores:Guyana 203 all out off 44.3 overs (Ronaldo Alimohamed 39, Kassem Khan 29, Akenie Adams 23, Keemo Paul 20, Oshane Thomas 3-41, Tyrone Daley 3-32, Odean Smith 2-51).Jamaica 204 for five off 45.2 overs (Shahid Crooks 73 not out, Ramone Francis 53; Sherfane Rutherford2-32).last_img

Melbourne, Kingston in key clash

first_imgOut-of-favour West Indies spinner Nikita Miller believes second-place Melbourne have what it takes to overcome the challenge of leaders Kingston in their top-of-the-table Jamaica Cricket Association 50-Overs Championship clash at Melbourne Oval today.The Zone D fixture, one of 11 final preliminary round matches on, weather permitting, will see Melbourne looking to win and stave off the challenges of St Thomas CA and Kensington CC, who are both looking to cop the second spot.The unbeaten Kingston, captained by Brandon King, have an unassailable 24 points after four matches, while Melbourne have 18.St Thomas and Kensington, who will meet at Goodyear Oval, have 12 points each.”It’s a crucial game, and when there is a crucial game like this, you have to go hard,” said Miller, captain of Melbourne.Out-of-contention Boys Town and Lucas will meet in the zone’s other encounter at Collie Smith Drive.In other matches, leaders St Elizabeth face eliminated Westmoreland, and second-position St James will host third-place Hanover in Zone A.Early qualifiers St Catherine CA will host Kingston and St Andrew CA, second-place St Catherine CC play eliminated Manchester, and third-place Clarendon welcome GC Foster College in Zone B.Meanwhile, in Zone C, University of the West Indies will travel to second-place St Ann, third-place Jamaica Defence Force play Portland at Folly Oval, while St Mary entertain Police at Three Hills Oval.last_img read more

More sports in brief

first_imgDelroy SeixasKO finalFirst-time entrants August Town will try to upstage defending champions Constant Spring in the Delroy Seixas KO final this Sunday, at Winchester Park, St George’s College, starting at 4 p.m.Constant Spring hammered August Town in Sunday’s Masters League KO semi-final at the same question.The big question is, can August Town turn it around after the walloping or will Constant Spring continue their winning ways?Come and find out this Sunday.USA, Mexico clash sold outMIAMI, Florida:CONCACAF today announced that the CONCACAF Cup play-off – presented by Scotiabank – between the United States and Mexico on Saturday at the Rose Bowl Stadium in Pasadena, California (6 p.m.Pacific Time), is sold out.The winner of the match, which will be televised in the US by Univision/UDN in Spanish and FS1 in English, will earn a berth in the prestigious FIFA Confederations Cup, to be played in Russia in 2017.”This is one of the biggest soccer games to be played on North American soil since the 1994 World Cup, and the fans have certainly responded,” said CONCACAF acting general secretary, Ted Howard.Bouchard retires from opening match at China OpenBEIJING (AP):A teary-eyed Eugenie Bouchard retired from her opening match against Andrea Petkovic at the China Open due to dizziness yesterday, her first match since falling at the US Open last month and suffering a concussion.Bouchard slipped in the locker room after her third-round win against Dominika Cibulkova at the US Open, falling backward and landing hard on the back of her head. She was forced to withdraw from the tournament, as well as subsequent tournaments in Tokyo and Wuhan, China.The Canadian was trailing 6-2, 1-1 against Petkovic yesterday when she decided to call it quits.”I thought I was physically ready, but unfortunately, the symptoms of my concussion came back,” Bouchard said in a statement. “I hope to get well soon and look forward to returning next year.”After Bouchard retired from the match, Petkovic came around the net to check on her.”I just asked her what happened and she told me that she felt very dizzy,” the German said. “Then I asked if it was the same, if it still was the concussion. She said yeah, it tends to come back when she gets physically very active.”Pakistan beat ZimbabweHARARE, Zimbabwe (AP):Bilal Asif took 5-25 and was also his team’s joint top-scorer to help Pakistan beat Zimbabwe by seven wickets yesterday and clinch their one-day international series 2-1. Playing just his second ODI, Asif was the standout player as Pakistan avoided a first-ever ODI series loss to Zimbabwe.Spinners Asif and Imad Wasim shared eight wickets as Zimbabwe were bowled out for 161 in 38.5 overs. Wasim took 3-36 and both claimed career-best figures, justifying Pakistan stand-in captain Sarfraz Ahmed’s decision to bowl first at Harare Sports Club.Pakistan reached 162-3 in 34 overs to add the ODI series to their 2-0 victory in the Twenty20 contest.last_img read more

Watch Vision Of Gold in Race 2

first_imgThe second Super-6 offers a$1.1 million carryover at Caymanas Park tomorrow, while the Pick-9 commences at the guaranteed minimum of $1 million.The Pick-9 will be conducted from race two to 10, the first Super-6 from race one to six, the late Super-6 from race five to 10.We look at the first Super-6 which commences with a maiden 4-y-o and up condition race over a mile to be contested by eight starters, including the likely favourite MINY LEE, who caught the eye when a close second to I HAVE A DREAM over 1400 metres on Boxing Day.Prior to that, he was a close third to MR ROMANTIC and subsequent winner ABOGADO, and with trainer Donovan Plummer churning out the winners in recent weeks, MINY LEE with apprentice Jerome Innis gets the nod over DEMOLITION BOY and LAZZA.VISION OF GOLD, who has shown promise in his two starts to date, will now prove hard to beat in the second race over 1300 metres for native-bred three-year-olds, with former champion Omar Walker aboard.From the stables of 15-time champion trainer Wayne DaCosta, the chestnut colt by Fearless Vision out of the 1999 derby winner Good Prospect has been fitted with the visor and tongue tie following his good third to STUNNER over 1400 metres two months ago and having looked improved at exercise, gets the nod over stable-companion PERFECT ASSET (Lasix administered) and OK DUDE in an 11-strong field.TROJAN, who has been knocking at the door, tries a longer distance (1820 metres) in the third race for four-year-olds and up, and this could be just what the doctor ordered, despite the presence of KING WITHIN and COLOURS OF WAR in a seven-horse field. Top apprentice Linton Steadman has the leg over TROJAN, who carries 53.0kg by virtue of his 3.0kg apprentice claim.Ultra-consistent EUSEBIA, who finished a close third to PRINCESS SHEMIKA and INFANTRY OFFICER over 1200 metres recently, gets the nod over old rival SIR D and GRANDE MARQUE in the fourth race for $180,000 claimers over the straight, with Richie Mitchell now taking the ride in a field of 11.BIRD CATCHER, who won decisively for jockey Wesley Henry and trainer Fitzroy Glispie recently in two-year-old company, faces a highly thought of debutante AWESOME DESTINY (a bay filly by Afleet Express – Seek, working well) in the fifth race over 1200 metres for three-year-olds and it should go down to the wire. Preference, however, is for BIRD CATCHER, who won in a good time over 1100 metres on December 13.Then close the first Super-6 with the speedy GLOBAL (Bebeto Harvey) in the sixth race over 1300 metres in which GOLDEN GLORY and CLASSY AVIATOR are twin dangers in a field of 15.FIRST SUPER-6 FANCIES(1) MINY LEE/DEMOLITION BOY(2) VISION OF GOLD/PERFECT ASSET(3) TROJAN/KING WITHIN(4) EUSEBIA/SIR D(5) BIRD CATCHER/AWESOME DESTINY(6) GLOBAL/GOLDEN GLORYlast_img read more

Tony Becca: Who will be the kings of Eden Gardens?

first_img This tournament has been exciting and wonderful, and it has produced some lovely cricket. It has not produced too much of the hit-or-miss swinging while batting. It has produced some elegant and classical strokes, some quality hitting straight down the ground, some extraordinary fielding and catching, and some teasing and baffling right-arm leg-spin bowling instead of the fast and straight variety pitched just short-of-a-length. The spin bowling throughout the entire tournament has been good, the batting of Gayle, 100 off 48 deliveries against England, including 11 sixes, was exciting, and the batting of Kohli, 55 off 37 deliveries against Pakistan, 82 not out off 51 deliveries against Australia, and 89 not out off 47 deliveries against the West Indies were magnificent. The batting of Roy, 78 off 44 deliveries against New Zealand, was tasty, the batting of Buttler, 32 off 17 against New Zealand was delightful, the bowling of spinners Ish Sodhi and Mitchell Santner of New Zealand, throughout was impressive, the stumping of Sabbir Rahman by Mahendra Singh Dhoni off Suresh Raina against Bangladesh was almost unbelievable, and many of the catches were simply extraordinary. India’s comeback victory over Bangladesh in the last over at the end of the innings, as Bangladesh, needing one run to tie with three wickets in hand, lost to India by one run off the last delivery; India beat Australia off the last delivery with Dhoni hitting a six, and the West Indies defeated South Africa with two deliveries to spare were some of the thrilling moments of 2016. If Gayle, Samuels, Russell, Badree and company from the West Indies; and England’s Root, Stokes, Buttler, and Rashid parade their skills today, the Eden Gardens will be the place to be. The action should be exciting and extraordinary, and it may not really matter who wins. The tournament started with eight of the 16 teams very close and having an equal chance of victory, and it is finishing, after some thrilling and exciting matches, with two of them, the powerful, hard-hitting West Indies, and the conservative, easy-going England, boasting an equal chance of snatching victory, even though my favourites must be the West Indies, who have already beaten England. England go in with a thrilling victory over the previously unbeaten New Zealand, the West Indies with an exciting victory with two deliveries to spare. In a nutshell, the teams boast exciting batting, probably with the exception of India’s Virat Kohli, the best in Twenty20 cricket, and they bat deep, one parading a batting powerhouse capable of hitting many sixes and many fours, the other known for their elegant drives and cuts which race away to the boundary. In Gayle, especially, and Charles, Samuels, and Simmons, however, plus Bravo, Russell, Sammy, and Brathwaite, the West Indies boast a batting line-up which, although it always promises to hit the ball very far hard and very far, and when it does, it can be very destructive, it sometimes, and quite often, falls very short of its attempted distance or regularity. England, on the other hand, possess more controlled batting, the type which can sometimes be conservative, more reliable and productive. The batting on either side, but especially on the West Indies side, could, however, depend on the luck of the day, on the opposition’s fielding on the day, and on their bowling throughout the day. The West Indies bowling, which may be Samuel Badree, Russell, Bravo, Brathwaite, Sulieman Benn, and probably Gayle, may, but for Badree, and probably Benn, find the going rough. England’s attack of the left-handed David Willey, Chris Jordan, Liam Plunkett, Stokes, Moeen Ali, and Adil Rashid is a bit more skilful and devious. It could put the West Indies batsmen under pressure, especially because of their big-hitting and sometimes careless reputation. On the other hand, if they report to the Eden Gardens bubbling with confidence, the West Indies batsmen could easily rip them apart. Despite their lack of skill, however, the West Indies bowlers may dismantle England’s sometimes timid batting. The key to the West Indies bowling could well be Bravo. His slower, dipping deliveries can be deadly, if he gets them right. One thing is certain, the fielding on both sides will be extraordinary. England’s fielding, especially that of Stokes and Jordan, is good, and sometimes brilliant. The West Indies fielding, especially the catching of Russell, Bravo, and Sammy, is sometimes truly breathtaking. Batting powerhouse Based on the action which has gone before, today’s finals of the ICC World Twenty20 cricket tournaments at the beautiful Eden Gardens stadium in Kolkata promise to be a grand occasion to be played before an estimated 100,000 cheering spectators. The finalists are the West Indies and Australia in the women’s event, and the West Indies against England in the men’s final. And after the triumph of the young West Indians recently, it will be a great day for the West Indies, especially if they win one or both matches. The men’s final, however, is the stellar event, and however it goes, it should be a shoot-out to remember. It features some of the finest players, not only in the new, flashy, and exciting style of T20 cricket, but also some of the best in the longer, more traditional, and more celebrated format and representing the West Indies and England, two past champions. On one hand, representing the West Indies, the people’s favourite is Chris Gayle, the world’s most destructive batsman, a big left-hander with 98 sixes already in his bag, and he is backed up by a few others who fear no foe, by Johnson Charles, Marlon Samuels, Lendl Simmons, Dwayne Bravo, and others like Andre Russell, Darren Sammy, and Carlos Brathwaite. On the other hand, representing England, the founders of the game, is Joe Root, one of the world’s best batsman technically, an elegant, attractive, and confident right-hander with a pocketful of runs in his possession, and he is supported by a mixture of fine batsmen in the confident opening pair of Jason Roy and Alex Hales, the solid Eoin Morgan, the dashing and fearless all-rounder Ben Stokes, the attacking Jos Buttler, and a few others. The two teams, who lit up the tournament, one in 2010 and one in 2012, are desperate for success this time around. England are fighting to establish themselves, especially in this exciting format of the game, and the West Indies are determined to confirm their success in the T20 style as opposed to their struggling and disappointing form in the longer versions of the game. Quality hittinglast_img read more

Green Pond draw, Dinthill win

first_img Irwin 1 Green Pond 1 Maldon 0 St James 3 Knockalva 1 Frome 4 Lacovia 2 Maggotty 1 Munro 1 Newell 1 Cross Keys 1 Manchester 5 Belair 0 BB Coke 2 deCarteret 0 Mile Gully 1 Lennon 5 Thompson Town 0 Edwin Allen 3 Claude McKay 1 York Castle 0 Steer Town 0 Ocho Rios 0 Marcus Garvey 1 Brown’s Town 2 Aabuthnott Gallimore 1 Charlemont 2 Guy’s Hill 2 Dinthill 3 Bog Walk 1 Winston Jones 0 Denbigh 2 Porus High 0 Garvey Maceo 1 Foga Road 0 Glenmuir 3 Today’s games Robert Lightbourne vs Yallahs Paul Bogle vs St Thomas Tech Seaforth vs Morant Bay Kemps Hill vs Old Harbour Vere Tech. vs Tacius Golding Brimmervale vs St. Mary High St Mary Tech. vs Iona High Christiana vs May Day Alston vs Spalding Bellefield vs Holmwood Little London vs Grange Hill Maud McLeod vs Manning’s Godfrey Stewart vs Petersfield Herbert Morrison vs William Knibb Holland vs Spot Valley Muschett vs Cedric Titus Central vs Bustamante Fair Prospect vs Happy Grove Oracabessa vs Port Antonio Tacky High vs Horace Clarke High WESTERN BUREAU: A Heavy and persistent downpour made the Zone A ISSA-FLOW daCosta Cup football game between Irwin High and Green Pond at Irwin a wretched experience, but in the end the 1-1 draw, according to the coaches, was a fair result. The rain had caused the field to be in puddles in certain sections by the scheduled kick-off time approached, and to make matters worse, it also accounted for the late arrival of the referee’s assistants. When they did arrive, the decision was taken to play two halves of 40 minutes each, as kick-off was already 40 minutes late. Forward Evardo Chambers missed two chances, but scored Green Pond’s all-important goal in the 37th minute. With their new coach, the experienced Anthony ‘Follies’ Williams, pulling the strings, Irwin went all out for the equaliser. It came with seconds left, following a mad scramble inside the six-yard box, which resulted in the ball rolling over the goal line and the referee signalling goal, with Green Pond’s goalkeeper, Kemar Ogle, left writhing in pain. He was eventually substituted and the game eventually ended in a 1-1 draw. “This is a work in progress for us,” stated Irwin’s coach Williams. “It was a spirited performance from the players and the wet conditions didn’t make it any better for us.” He added: “There is potential here and we are taking it match by match to see how far we can actually go. But I am all night with this draw, which could have been worse for us.” For Daley, however, it was two points lost. “We should have won the game hands down. We missed several chances to easily secure three points. But I will take this,” he said. Meanwhile, St James High joined Cornwall College at the top of Zone A with three points, after their 3-0 victory over Maldon, who are in last place in the zone. In Zone K, last year’s beaten finalists, Dinthill Technical, began their campaign with a 3-1 win over Bog Walk. Yesterday’s resultslast_img read more

Hubert Lawrence | Student athletes and academics

first_img GOOD NEWS It’s brilliant that a fourth-form class of 33 students at Wolmer’s Girls’ School could sit CXC Mathematics and hammer it to the tune of 33 distinctions. This accomplishment speaks volumes about the aptitude and attitude of the girls, the work of their teacher and the learning environment provided at the school. A closer look reveals good news for sport. Five of those 33 bright sparks represent Wolmer’s in sport. This quintet includes national Under-17 goalkeeper Oneilia Yearde, three track and field hopefuls and the other is part of the traditionally strong Wolmer’s volleyball group. Their success flies in the face of the conventional wisdom that asserts that academics and sport don’t mix. We’ve all heard the stories about sportsmen who needed help to complete their travel documents, capable only of a barely legible scribble for a signature. I haven’t heard those tales in years. The Inter-Secondary Schools Sports Association (ISSA), the governing body for high school sport and the teachers in our schools deserve a lot of credit. Years ago, ISSA instituted a minimum academic performance eligibility rule. This statute sets out to ensure that student-athletes have to make an effort in the classroom as well as on the field of play. Recently, I witnessed a teacher handing out assignments to members of a Manning Cup team after a match. She issued a word of encouragement to each recipient and reminded all of the due date for completion. That type of care and diligence for our student-sports is very valuable. The teacher of the Wolmer’s 33 is Lance McFarlane, a Boys and Girls’ Championships medal-winning sprint hurdler and 400-metre runner for Kingston College (KC) in 1999 and 2000. Teacher McFarlane represents another piece of good news. Though his days as an active athlete are long gone, he is excelling in the classroom. With his help, those 33 young ladies have put CXC mathematics behind them. Now they can tackle fifth form with a lighter course load and with the confidence that they can do well at whatever they choose. He also is a symbol of a productive life for retired sportsmen and women. Retirement comes sooner, for some like McFarlane, or later for luminaries like the incomparable Usain Bolt, but it comes nevertheless. If they pursue their new lives with the energy they showed as athletes, they can be successful. Some may walk away as Bolt plans to do next year as global brands, with the world at their feet. Others may test the waters in business before they retire like super sprinter Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. Whatever the course of action, all must carefully map the way forward for the rest of their lives. For now, let’s all hail Yearde and her fellow student-athletes in that stellar group of 33 at Wolmer’s Girl’s. Along with their teacher, they represent bright hope for the future. – Hubert Lawrence has made notes at trackside since 1980.last_img read more

Hubert Lawrence | Athlete of the Year: Thompson vs Wlodarczyk – Take you pick

first_imgIt seemed pretty clear to me that Poland’s undefeated, double world record setting hammer throw Olympic gold medallist Anita Wlodarczyk was a sure bet for this year’s Athlete of the Year Award. That was until a bright-minded friend stopped me in my tracks. His message was simple – world records aren’t created equal. That devalued the huge world record throw of 82.29 metres Wlodarczyk used to win her second Olympic gold medal in Rio di Janeiro and even bigger heave – 82.98, which she produced later in her supreme 13 meet season. He reasoned that the hammer throw, which made its Olympic debut as recently as 2000, is so young that records are easy to come by. By contrast, the records in the 100 and 200 metres are out in never-never land at 10.49 and 21.34 seconds, respectively. He applies the same reasoning to the women’s 3000-metre steeplechase where Ruth Jebet of Bahrain, another contender for the big award, has dismantled the world record. Given that Jamaica’s Elaine Thompson won two Olympic gold medals and not just one like the big Pole and the tiny Bahrani, he reckons that Thompson has as good a chance as they do to be named female Athlete of the Year. The one medal-two medals argument has pros and cons. Sprinters like Thompson can apply the same skills to more than one event because they are similar. Often, field event skills, like throwing the hammer, are so specific that the athlete can’t even conceive of doing another discipline. That aside, the patriot inside me had to look more closely to see if he was right. The big question is whether Thompson’s 7-win 100-metre season and her 3-2 200-metre campaign is superior in quality to Wlodarczyk’s 2016 compilation of gold, no losses and eight 80-metre throws. The slim lady from Banana Ground sped to the three fastest 100-metre times of the year – 10.70 to win the National Senior Championships, matching the Jamaican record held by Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, 10.71 to win in Rio and 10.72 seconds to win at the Brussels Diamond League meet. Her gold-winning 200-metre time was the fastest by anyone in 2016 at 21.78 seconds. The search for comparisons between Thompson, Wlodarczyk and the other main contender for the award leads to the IAAF Scoring Tables. Designed by the sport’s governing body to quiet vexing questions like this one, the tables produced a stunning conclusion. The Jamaican scores 1255 points from her 10.70 100-metre clocking and a similar amount – 1250 – for her fast Rio 200. The same tables give the blond Pole a slam dunk score of 1303 points for her second world record and 1292 for the one that took her to the top of the podium in Rio. If those tables are any guide, Thompson would have to run 10.45 or 21.20 to match Wlodarcyzk’s second world record! It’s staggering to think that an 80-metre hammer throw equates to sprint times of 10.70 and 21.72 seconds respectively. When you consider that Wlodarczyk had seven 80-metre plus throws, it’s a big deal. Almaz Ayanna’s gold medal-winning 10,000 metre world record of 29 minutes 17.45 seconds was pretty tasty too. It gathered 1288 points for the tireless Ethiopian. While you digest that, note that Jebet gets 1263 points for her world record of 8 minutes 52.78 seconds in a discipline that was added to the Olympic track and field programme as recently as 2008. Single-handedly, she bumped the all-time total of sub-9 minute steeplechase times up from one – the old world record of 8 minutes 58.81 seconds – to four. Her Olympic year hat-trick of sub-9 clockings included her winning time in Rio, 8.59.75. While Thompson, Ayanna and Jebet all lost races in the season, South African Caster Semenya was undefeated in her prime event. However, the IAAF tables give Semenya’s fastest 800-metre time of 1 minute 55.28 seconds a mere 1239 points. The sole 2016 loss for US 100-metre hurdler Kendra Harrison came at the wrong time. Sadly, she was an uncharacteristic sixth at her nation’s Olympic Trials. Harrison was otherwise spotless and peaked with a world record of 12.20 seconds, worth 1255 points. There are only two possible conclusions. Either the IAAF Scoring Tables have led this discussion down the garden path or Wlodarczyk is the Athlete of the Year by virtue of a season better in quality to the efforts of every other female athlete on Earth. That would include Ayanna, Jebet and Thompson. Take your pick. – Hubert Lawrence has made notes at track side since 1980. VEXING QUESTIONSlast_img read more

Windies Women suffer defeat after batting flop

first_imgVIJAYAWADA, India CMC: Another batting failure saw West Indies Women crash to a disappointing six-wicket defeat to India Women in the opening One-Day International of the three-match series here yesterday. Opting to bat first, the Caribbean side’s batting woes continued from the recent series against England Women as they slumped to a paltry 131 all out off 42.4 overs at the Mulapadu Cricket Ground. Former captain Merissa Aguilleira top-scored with a defiant, unbeaten 42 off 77 deliveries but was one of only three batsmen in double figures, with teenage opener Hayley Matthews getting 24 and captain Stafanie Taylor, 19. The damage was done by left-arm spinners Rajeshwari Gayakwad, who finished with four for 21, and Ekta Bisht, who claimed three for 14. West Indies Women were 63 for three in the 17th over but collapsed to lose their last seven wickets for 68 runs. In reply, India were tottering on 36 for four in the 17th over before Veda Krishnamurthy stroked an unbeaten 52 and captain Mithali Raj, 46 not out, to see the hosts over the line in the 40th over. The pair put on a brilliant 97 in an unbroken fifth-wicket stand as they powered India to a precious two ICC Women’s Championship points. Fast bowler Shakera Selman was superb on her return to the squad, claiming two for 11 from her nine overs. West Indies Women, in contrast with India Women, now find themselves under pressure to win the remaining two games in order to make safe their automatic qualification for next year’s 50-overs World Cup in England. West Indies Women face India Women in the second game of the series on Sunday at the same venue.last_img read more

Market Force surges to Monday Morning Trophy

first_imgTrainer Richard Azan and stable apprentice Bebeto Harvey teamed up to win their second trophy on consecutive racedays yesterday at Caymanas Park, thanks to a 10-1 upset by the unbeaten MARKET FORCE in the inaugural running of the Monday Morning Trophy over 1400 metres for three-year-olds.Azan and 2.0kg-claiming apprentice Harvey had won last Saturday’s open allowance feature for the Bonnie Blue Flag Trophy over 1820 metres with 1-5 favourite FRANFIELD, this in a driving finish from BLUE DIXIE.This time around, MARKET FORCE romped to an easy victory, 4 1/2 lengths ahead of the 3-2 favourite RADICAL, who finished fast after experiencing a rough passage in a large field of 15. MARKET FORCE was never far off the pace in fifth passing as the 99-1 outsider TRUE WHISPER led from EMPRESS HALL (6-1), WONG DON (7-1) and highly fancied MALACHI (2-1).He quickened into the lead on entering the straight, disposing of TRUE WHISPER and MALACHI for a facile win, covering the distance in the good time of 1:26.1. UNFINISHEDBUSINESS at 29-1 was third, ahead of EMPRESS HALL in fourth.VASTLY IMPROVEDMARKET FORCE, who made a winning debut over 1100 metres last November in a two-year-old race, reported with Lasix administered for the first time and looked a vastly improved animal in the process. He could take his place in the 2000 Guineas field on April 8.The race was run in honour of the 1987 Triple Crown winner and ‘Horse of the Year’ MONDAY MORNING. The trophy was presented to the Azans by veteran trainer Stanley Findlay, who saddled MONDAY MORNING to win the 2000 Guineas in April, 1987. However, the horse was subsequently transferred to the stables of Enos Brown, who saddled him to win the derby and St Leger, not to mention the Gold Cup that year.Another lightly raced three-year-old colt showed classic potential, winning the opening race over 1300 metres for maidens by the proverbial city block. The son of Strikewhileithot – VOODOO CHANT bolted off the track on his debut in the closing stages of the Front Runner Sprint when having the race at his mercy, but duly made amends as the 1-9 favourite. He was ridden by Robert Halledeen for trainer Anthony ‘Baba’ Nunes.Among the four winning favourites on the card was the Patrick Lynch-trained 3-5 favourite TALENTED TONY K, who made all in the overnight allowance sprint, holding on by a neck from RAS EMANUEL at 6-1 with Shane Ellis aboard.last_img read more