Virtual vocal tract can lead to speech via brain signals

first_imgLos Angeles: Scientists have created a virtual vocal tract — completes with lips, jaw and tongue — that can generate natural-sounding synthetic speech by using brain signals. The brain-machine interface created by neuroscientists at University of California, San Francisco in the US could one day restore the voices of people who have lost the ability to speak due to paralysis and other forms of neurological damage. Stroke, traumatic brain injury, and neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s disease, multiple sclerosis, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, or Lou Gehrig’s disease) often result in an irreversible loss of the ability to speak. Also Read – Saudi Crown Prince ‘snubbed’ Pak PM, recalled jet from USSome people with severe speech disabilities learn to spell out their thoughts letter-by-letter using assistive devices that track very small eye or facial muscle movements. However, producing text or synthesised speech with such devices is laborious, error-prone, and painfully slow, typically permitting a maximum of 10 words per minute, compared to the 100-150 words per minute of natural speech. The system, described in the journal Nature, demonstrates that it is possible to create a synthesised version of a person’s voice that can be controlled by the activity of their brain’s speech centres. Also Read – Record number of 35 candidates in fray for SL Presidential pollsIn the future, this approach could not only restore fluent communication to individuals with severe speech disability, researchers said, but could also reproduce some of the musicality of the human voice that conveys the speaker’s emotions and personality. “For the first time, this study demonstrates that we can generate entire spoken sentences based on an individual’s brain activity,” said Edward Chang, a professor at University of California, San Francisco. “The relationship between the movements of the vocal tract and the speech sounds that are produced is a complicated one,” said Gopala Anumanchipalli, a speech scientist who led the study. “We reasoned that if these speech centers in the brain are encoding movements rather than sounds, we should try to do the same in decoding those signals,” Anumanchipalli said. Researchers asked five volunteers with intact speech who had electrodes temporarily implanted in their brains to map the source of their seizures in preparation for neurosurgery to treat epilepsy — to read several hundred sentences aloud while the researchers recorded activity from a brain region known to be involved in language production. Based on the audio recordings of participants’ voices, the researchers used linguistic principles to reverse engineer the vocal tract movements needed to produce those sounds: pressing the lips together here, tightening vocal cords there, shifting the tip of the tongue to the roof of the mouth, then relaxing it, and so on. This detailed mapping of sound to anatomy allowed the scientists to create a realistic virtual vocal tract for each participant that could be controlled by their brain activity. This comprised two “neural network” machine learning algorithms: a decoder that transforms brain activity patterns produced during speech into movements of the virtual vocal tract, and a synthesiser that converts these vocal tract movements into a synthetic approximation of the participant’s voice. The synthetic speech produced by these algorithms was significantly better than synthetic speech directly decoded from participants’ brain activity without the inclusion of simulations of the speakers’ vocal tracts, the researchers found. The algorithms produced sentences that were understandable to hundreds of human listeners in crowdsourced transcription tests.last_img read more

UN official concerned over new movement restrictions being prepared by Israel

Speaking to reporters after returning from the occupied Palestinian territories, Rene Aquarone, Chief of the Geneva Liaison Office of the UN Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA), said that under the new system, any Palestinian who wanted to move from one city to another in the West Bank would need a permit valid for one month. In addition, Jerusalem ID card holders would be prevented from traveling to the occupied territories. As a result, UNRWA and other agencies would have to use international drivers for all of their vehicles. “We are very concerned because if these announced measures are put into effect, this will cripple the activities of the Agency,” Mr. Aquarone said. “We are trying to engage with the authorities and explain to them that of course this is not in conformity with the responsibilities of Israel as an occupying power, and certainly not in accordance either with its responsibilities to the Agency.” UNRWA, which currently employs close to 14,000 Palestinian staffers in the Palestinian territories and some 100 international staffers, is now monitoring the possible implementation of the new measures, according to Mr. Aquarone. read more

UN agencies respond to health needs of blast victims in DPR of

International agencies, including the World Health Organization (WHO), the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP), the International Federation of the Red Cross and the non-governmental organization (NGO) Caritas International are providing medical assistance and food to hospitals in the Ryongchon area, according to the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA). While noting overall medical treatment is being provided at a reasonable level, WHO reported that medical supplies such as eye treatments, topical creams, compresses for burns and certain antibiotics remain in short supply, OCHA said. On Tuesday a WHO team visited four hospitals, where an estimated two-thirds of the injured are children. Patients suffer mainly from injuries to the face and head, burns and bruises. Meanwhile, UNICEF has delivered some 500 kilograms of therapeutic milk to Sinuiju hospital for patients unable to eat solid food. WHO has recommended that normal health services be restored in Ryongchon as soon as possible, with emphasis placed on rebuilding the county hospital and health clinic. Support for health services will be needed well after the emergency phase of the response ends as some of the victims will suffer permanent disabilities and require rehabilitation services, OCHA said. UNICEF is working with the Ministry of Education to ensure that education services are resumed as soon as possible. In addition to providing the physical infrastructure and school equipment, WHO has recommended that psychosocial support is also given to the children and the community as a whole. read more

UN marks Palestinian Solidarity Day with calls for peace with Israel

“Let us commit ourselves to breathing new life into the peace process so that the goals of statehood for Palestinians, and security for the State of Israel, can be realized before this tragedy takes too many more lives,” United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan said in a message for the Day.“A peaceful settlement of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict remains heart-rendingly elusive. Successive opportunities to move the peace process forward have not borne fruit. And the situation on the ground is deeply troubling,” he added.He noted that he had urged Israel to exercise maximum restraint in the Gaza Strip, where its military operations have resulted “in a dramatic rise in civilian casualties and in the destruction of property and infrastructure.”At the same time, Israelis “rightly demand” that the Palestinian Authority take credible action to prevent attacks against them and their territory with constant rocket attacks by Palestinian militants against Israeli civilian targets that “are unacceptable and should be stopped at once,” he said.He called on international donors to take immediate action to alleviate the acute suffering in the West Bank and Gaza but stressed that the two parties themselves bore “the primary responsibility for finding their way out of their predicament, by engaging in a viable political process that can lead to the peace their peoples both yearn for.” Later, addressing the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, Mr. Annan said the announcement of a cease-fire in Gaza gave a glimmer of hope that the latest round of hostilities might give way to a period of calm. “I call on both sides to adhere to this commitment, and to avoid any actions that could jeopardize further progress. I also encourage them to extend the ceasefire to the West Bank,” he added. The head of the main UN organization for Palestinian refugees pledged continued support. “Today, the challenges are as great as they have ever been,” UN Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) Commissioner-General Karen Koning AbuZayd said. “All aspects of Palestinian life are affected by uncertainty, economic instability and conflict.”General Assembly President Sheikha Haya Al Khalifa called for the support of the international community to help both parties reach a solution through dialogue. “Our moral duty makes it imperative for us to find a comprehensive, just and permanent solution for this conflict that has continued for more than half a century,” she told the Committee.The Committee, together with the Palestinian Permanent Observer Mission, has also organized the screening of the film “The colour of olives” and the opening of an exhibit entitled “Contextualization: A Palestinian narrative,” both at UN Headquarters in New York.Also today, the General Assembly began its debate on the question of Palestine and the situation in the Middle East. President Sheikha Haya underscored the gravity of the situation in the Occupied Palestinian Territory. Deepening poverty, destruction of infrastructure and shortage of food only aggravated the situation, heightened desperation and encouraged extremism, she said, calling for an end to the killing spree on both sides. The lives of civilians must be preserved at any price, she stressed, adding that only then could dialogue be resumed and a political solution achieved. The Chairman of the Committee of the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, Paul Badji introduced a number of draft resolutions on the issues now under consideration by the Assembly. read more

Supreme Court leaves state assault weapons bans in place

by The Associated Press Posted Jun 20, 2016 7:43 am MDT Last Updated Jun 20, 2016 at 8:40 am MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email WASHINGTON – The Supreme Court has rejected challenges to assault weapons bans in Connecticut and New York, in the aftermath of the shooting attack on a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida, that left 50 people dead.The justices on Monday left in place a lower court ruling that upheld laws that were passed in response to another mass shooting involving a semi-automatic weapon, the elementary school attack in Newtown, Connecticut.The Supreme Court has repeatedly turned away challenges to gun restrictions since two landmark decisions that spelled out the right to a handgun to defend one’s own home.In December, less than a month after a mass shooting in San Bernardino, California, Justices Clarence Thomas and Antonin Scalia dissented when the court refused to hear an appeal to overturn a Chicago suburb’s ban on assault weapons. Scalia died in February.Seven states and the District of Columbia have enacted laws banning assault weapons. The others are California, Hawaii, Maryland, Massachusetts and New Jersey, according to the Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence. In addition, Minnesota and Virginia regulate assault weapons, the centre said.Connecticut and New York enacted bans on assault weapons and large-capacity magazines in response to the December 2012 massacre of 20 children and six educators at the Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut. The gunman, Adam Lanza, shot and killed his mother before driving to the school where he gunned down the victims with a Bushmaster AR-15 rifle. Lanza then killed himself.In Orlando, gunman Omar Mateen used a Sig Sauer MCX semi-automatic rifle and a pistol during the attack at Pulse nightclub. Mateen was killed in a shootout with police after killing 49 others. Supreme Court leaves state assault weapons bans in place read more

Addressing UN Lebanese Prime Minister calls on world powers to end ongoing

“The whole world contemplated with horror his 3-year-old body washed ashore to his eternal rest,” Prime Minister Tammam Salam told world leaders. “His tragedy sums up the prevailing fundamental human rights in our region.”He said the picture describes the story of “tormented people, drifting in the seas to nowhere, jam packed on the sidewalks in cities and train stations, waiting for a permission, a visa or simply a meal.”“If Europe, with its sizeable capacities and generous humanity, has been confused at the sight of thousands of displaced erupting suddenly in its cities, Lebanon, with its limited space and scarce capacities has been crawling for the past four years under the burden of one million and a half displaced Syrians, amounting to one third of its population,” the Lebanese leader added.He explained that the problem of the displaced is only one facet of the many negative repercussions Lebanon has endured as a result of the neighbouring war – terrorism being the most daunting consequence of this conflict that claimed “steep sacrifices.” “It is no secret that for more than a year now, a group of our military forces is still held by terrorist groups, and we are still exerting tremendous efforts to free them,” he underlined.He also indicated that despite the many political crises Lebanon is enduring, chiefly the vacuum on the Presidency of the Republic, the country is proud of being a “paragon of diversity and an oasis of coexistence between members of different religions and sects, at a time of surging Middle Eastern events threatening the social, cultural and religious diversity.”On the issue of the new agreement between Iran and the five permanent members of the Security Council [United States, France, United Kingdom, China, Russia] and Germany, Prime Minister Salam said it will “open a new page” in international relations and mark the beginning of an improvement “in the regional environments, which will reflect positively on the political situation in Lebanon.”Meanwhile, thanking all those serving within the UN Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), he called on the international community to compel Israel to cease its violations of Lebanese sovereignty, cooperate with UNIFIL to demarcate the rest of the Blue Line [separating Israel and Lebanon and the Litani River], and withdraw immediately from the northern Ghajar area, Shebaa Farms and Kfarshuba Hills.“Lebanon denounces Israel’s continued occupation of Palestinian land and its blockade of the Gaza Strip, and calls upon the international community to compel it to lift this inhuman blockade and secure the conditions for a decent living for the Palestinians,” Prime Minister Salam added.He further noted that while Lebanon is rejecting the resettlement of refugees on its territory, it is stressing the right of Palestinians to return to their homeland, according to the international resolutions. read more

Rio Tinto signs joint venture agreement with CODELCO for copper exploration in

first_imgRio Tinto has signed an exploration joint venture agreement with CODELCO, the world’s largest copper producer. Under the terms of the agreement, Rio Tinto and CODELCO’s 100%-owned subsidiary SCM Los Andes will jointly contribute mineral rights in Chile to the joint venture, which will be managed by Rio Tinto. This is the first joint venture that Rio Tinto has entered into with state-owned CODELCO. Bret Clayton, Chief Executive, Copper, Rio Tinto said “This landmark agreement combines the strengths of two highly experienced copper producers. Together, we hope to unlock value from a highly prospective copper belt in the biggest copper producing country in the world. We look forward to a long and deepening relationship with CODELCO”.The property to be explored is the Exploradora prospect in northern Chile. Rio Tinto has the option to earn a 55% interest in the prospect through an exploration investment of $20 million, with the potential to increase ownership to 60%.Rio Tinto has been exploring in Chile since 1989 and has several copper exploration properties under title which are scheduled for drill-testing in 2008.last_img read more

New Fallout 4 DLC proves Bethesda is becoming a real world Vaulttec

first_imgWhen Bethesda acquired the rights to the Fallout franchise, they greatly expanded on the idea that Vault-tec was secretly using their bomb shelters to run cruel “Social Experiments” on the poor dwellers trapped inside them. Fallout 2 only briefly mentioned this idea, but Fallout 3 was filled with wacky vaults designed to test bizarre theories. Fallout 4 allowed players to build and run their own wasteland towns, and each of the DLC packs have added increasingly sadistic opportunities for players to mistreat their virtual townsfolk. With the new Vault-tec Workshop DLC, players get everything they need to become full-fledged Overseers who actively torment their citizens, all while their malevolent corporate overlords gather data from these fiendish experiments.Fallout 4 has a substantial DLC plan, six separate pieces of it. Half of them are story-based, and half are called “Workshops”. We here at Geek.com didn’t much care for the previous two workshops. Wasteland and Contraptions didn’t have quests, or even much of a tutorial to explain what to do with the piles of craftable items that they included. They built on the flawed settlement system, doing very little to fix the existing problems with the game. Even though some people enjoy these systems, players who didn’t already  like the crafting and settlements would find very little practical value to the workshop DLC. The Vault-tec Workshop took note. It is more than a pile of new things to build; there is a quest, a fairly sizable new area to explore, and the new items have tangible value for players when they are out adventuring.The story starts with a distress call from the Overseer of a heretofore unmentioned vault. Vault 88 wasn’t completed before the Great War, and its Overseer has been trapped inside, still alive after 200 years thanks to her becoming a ghoul. The vault is little more than a giant cavern filled with dilapidated construction equipment. This big hole in the ground isn’t much use to the feral ghouls and radscorpions who live there, but it’s the perfect spot to build a new settlement. There is plenty of soil for growing crops, the pre-war junk provides an abundance of scrap, plus there’s a massive water pump (With a sturdy water chip, unlike that ramshackle Vault 13).Because it’s a mine, players can even “Scrap” parts of the walls to gain concrete and uranium. This mining feature also serves to unlock new areas of the cavern to explore. Unfortunately, these new areas are often full of hostile monsters that attack while the Workshop menu is up, and it’s very frustrating to get attacked by a deathclaw while in the middle of building something.The cavern is spacious enough to create the biggest settlement yet, and this DLC includes a couple of new kinds of generator to power large settlements. In keeping with the Vault-tec theme, most of the new structures and furnishings have the  clean look of a freshly-built vault. Just about all of this can be crafted in other settlements too, finally allowing players to make their settlements look shiny and chrome, rather rusted and filthy.People who don’t care about crafting will be happy to see that one of the new items they can make is a console that allows them to track down missing companion characters. The same console also allows players to rapidly assign jobs to unemployed settlers, rather than micromanaging them one at a time. All of this makes the new population management system a godsend – almost worth the five dollar asking price for the DLC (Although this feature should have been part of the game right from the beginning).Players unlock much of this right away, but there are a handful of things that need to be unlocked through a series of brief missions. Vault 88’s original, ghoulified Overseer is obsessed with testing out some special prototype equipment that she designed. When The Sole Survivor arrives, she finally has the chance to try out her insidious gadgets on unsuspecting wastelanders. What follows is a series of darkly comedic mini-quests where the Player can help torment an unfortunate human guinea pig named Clem.This quest  is where the lines blur between Vault-tec and Bethesda. Vault-tec provided the Overseer with the resources she needed to conduct her cruel experiments. Her obsessive nature then compelled her to carry them out no matter how long it took (With The Sole Survivor doing the dirty work, in the end). Other Overseers in the Fallout games carried out their orders, too. They allowed unethical medical experiments, left unsuspecting people trapped in indefinite cryogenic storage, or wielded undisputed power over a captive population in a vault that would never open.Meanwhile, in the real world, Bethesda has been handing players all the tools they need to engage in similar experiments with their own virtual guinea pigs. Wasteland Workshop and Contraptions included traps that had little practical value, and simply begged the player to try them out on a random townsperson. There are even Achievements and Trophies for using these torture devices to pillory innocent settlers. Again, The Sole Survivor is the true perpetrator of these virtual atrocities, or at least, that’s what players can tell themselves.The Overseers performed their tasks, certain that the Vault-tec Board of Directors was observing, and nodding approvingly. Players do the same, hoping they will get Bethesda’s approval, perhaps in the form of an achievement if they can cannibalize enough corpses to earn the maximum level of affinity with the super mutant Strong.In the Vault-tec Workshop, players can run the experiments with a degree of respect for the subject. However, Overseer Barstow insists that they will gather the most data if the tests are conducted with ruthless disregard for their poor guinea pig, Clem. This all implies that the player, too, will be rewarded for taking the unethical route through this quest. In a sense, the Player actually is rewarded with some dark comedy as Clem suffers for their amusement.If the Player casts aside their ethics, Clem can be poisoned, electrocuted, brainwashed, and kept in indentured servitude through compulsive gambling. Here again the lines blur. Vault-tec has a slot machine that can be built in Vault 88, and gamblers have a random chance of a getting a big reward when they play. Meanwhile, the Overseer is secretly monitoring them to gather data on how how they play the game.This random jackpot payoff is much like real world free-to-play games, including Bethesda’s own Fallout Shelter. This game and others like it use a business model where players can spend real world money for randomized rewards in the hope of getting rare premium items for their game. Compulsive buyers, called “Whales” by game designers, are manipulated and data-mined just as much as the fictional Clem.The pointless opportunities for sadism in Fallout 4’s DLC seem like yet another “Social Experiment”. The Sole Survivor begins the game as a wholesome suburbanite, but the Player chooses what this character will become.What does it take to encourage players to make a virtual Lord Humongous, Immortan Joe, or Aunty Entity? Is it enough to reward them with a good joke in the dialog wheel? Can a player’s morals be influenced by an achievement? Will players slaughter the virtual innocents for a unique suit of armor? Does it take nothing more than a funny animation as Clem is devoured by deathclaws in the Thunderdome? Perhaps, somewhere in Beth-tec’s headquarters, there is a real-life Overseer monitoring this Social Experiment. Nodding approvingly as players exercise their power over Clem.Spoilers, it’s Todd Howard.last_img read more

Fishing report 61

first_imgTrout season begins its six-month run at Swift Reservoir on Saturday, with 45,000 rainbow trout stocked to fuel fishing from now through November.The reservoir on Wednesday was within 4 feet of full pool, so launching at Swift Forest Camp will not be an issue.Spring chinook fishing opened today in the Lewis River and North Fork from the mouth to the power lines downstream of Merwin Dam. The daily limit is six hatchery chinook salmon, of which only one may be an adult. Angling is open for hatchery chinook and hatchery steelhead.The Klickitat River is open daily starting today from the mouth to Fisher Hill Bridge and from 400 feet upstream of No. 5 fishway to markers downstream of Klickitat Salmon Hatchery.The salmon limit is six hatchery chinook a day of which no more than two may be adults. In addition, up to three hatchery steelhead may be retained.Walleye fishing remains good in The Dalles and John Day pools, although has cooled from the exceptional catches of April and early May. Smallmouth bass also are biting well in the two reservoirs.last_img read more

Former police gunned down three being hunted

first_imgFacebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsAppAnother brazen daytime heist is exposing a sickening trend for the Turks and Caicos and the prevalence of firearms on the streets of Provo. A veteran former police officer and owner of Tag Security Services, Alboin Williams was struck and survived the shooting said to be at point blank range while on a money pick up for Sunny Foods grocery store on Sunday. Williams, was fired upon several times, reportedly while he was down on the ground by assailants who tried to flee the scene in Five Cays but may have failed in that attempt. Police confirmed to Magnetic Media that multiple suspects were in custody being questioned in the case, and a nearby a white sedan was undergoing forensic testing as it is believed a suspect vehicle, aka, the possible getaway car. “The culprits who were described as 5’4”, 5’9” and 5’11” all dark complexion and medium built, got away with an undisclosed amount of cash. Presently, there are two men in police custody assisting in the investigations.”As for Williams, it was unconfirmed up to news production time what condition the man, said to be in his 50s was in… but he did survive the ambush and was taken to hospital for treatment. In an unrelated incident, Police on Friday updated that they found the 2004 Nissan March which was stolen with personal items from a tourist family in North West Point, Provo last Thursday. The car was found ditched in Five Cays in bushes near the beach. Facebook Twitter Google+LinkedInPinterestWhatsApp Related Items:last_img read more

The World Wide Web at 30 feels a lot like the early

first_img Internet Laptops Computers Desktops Share your voice World Wide Web founder Tim Berners-Lee at LeWeb 2014 Stephen Shankland/CNET The internet has many birthdays. There was 1969, when remote computers communicated directly for the first time. Then there was 1983, when the TCP/IP standard was adopted. Today we’re celebrating 1989, the year Tim Berners-Lee laid out the basic concepts of the World Wide Web in a proposal, which included ideas like HTML, URL, and HTTP. March marks the 30th anniversary of that last milestone, which is perhaps the most important one, as the web is primarily what we think of as the “internet” today. cernAnd 30 years later, we have Seamless.  Tim Berners-Lee/CERN A few days ahead of that anniversary, Berners-Lee is giving a talk in Washington DC at the Washington Post Live Center about the founding of the web and the decades that followed. It’s a topic that resonates with me (and likely a lot of people in my age group) because I was there from nearly the beginning. In the middle of an industry obsessed with youth, I don’t often like to admit it, but my first email address came in the form of an undergraduate VAX (virtual address extension) account. I recall that email address being at least partly comprised of my social security number, which gives you an idea of the state of online security at the time. Version 1.0In the early to mid ’90s, we were all stumbling around the in the dark. We discovered things like Mosaic, the first web browser most of us ever saw. I registered my first domain name (which I still own) in January 1998, about eight months before Google was incorporated. Like many ’90s kids starting their careers after college and grad school, I ended up as a part of the Dotcom 1.0 boom. Mid-1998 saw me make the jump from print magazines and becoming employee number 20-something at a pop culture and video game web property called UGO.com, then a spinoff of an early ecommerce company called Interworld. We were bright young things gripping our on-paper stock options, calculating just how much cash we’d rake in for an IPO that always seemed just over the horizon. garySadly, we could not.  Screenshot by Dan Ackerman That IPO never happened, but I did manage to be a part of the one of the first viral publicity events of the era. My colleagues and I created the Gary Coleman Webathon, which was the first online celebrity fundraising event. Gary’s gone now, and so is UGO, shut down by one the publishers that scooped it up along along the way for a pittance. (Humanity-affirming footnote: The original UGO editorial crew still gets together about once a year or so, even though most of us last worked together almost 20 years ago.) But even as a grizzled internet veteran, I’m lucky enough to have avoided most of the biggest disasters of the Dotcom 1.0 era. I left companies before they imploded and eventually landed here. My wife was not as lucky, riding some of the most infamous Dotcom flameouts down into the ground, including Kozmo.com and TheGlobe.com. Everyone back then was addicted to checking and rechecking what may have been the TechCrunch of its day, a daily compendium of layoffs and shutdowns, with a name I won’t mention here. Let’s do the time warp againWhat’s amazing to me, now that the World Wide Web enters its third decade, is that I still have much of the same sense of wide-eyed wonder about the the possibilities that lie ahead. From online augmented reality experiences to impossibly thin laptops to artificial intelligence in anything and everything, I still can’t wait to see what’s next. But there are also things that feel familiar, and not always in a good way. Consider this my old-man-waving-a-stick warning, but the endless cycle of hype over everything — from cryptocurrency to blockchain to virtual and augmented reality to new ways to share social media experiences — often reminds me of the boiler room salesmanship of pre-Dotcom Bust era. Today it’s Theranos, Google Plus and Juicero. Back then it was Pets.com, Pseudo and Flooz (look it up). But the Dotcom 1.0 version of me would have also found many of today’s online experiences mindblowing. From the democratization of live video broadcasting to decades of movies and music on-demand to maintaining more-important-than-they-sound social media weak ties with childhood friends and industry colleagues. Despite a growing dark side of technology that has led to major problems like rampant data misuse and the social media hate speech and harassment crisis, I still believe the web’s best days are ahead of it.  3center_img Comments Tagslast_img read more

Floatplane capsizes in Ketchikan all evacuated safely

first_imgA commercial floatplane with a pilot and four passengers capsized in Ketchikan but all escaped without harm.The Ketchikan Daily News reports the Alaska Seaplane Tours floatplane was returning from a tour late Monday morning and struck something as it landed in Tongass Narrows.The Coast Guard says one float was punctured and it took on water.Ketchikan Police Department Sgt. Andy Berntson says the float was sinking as the plane tried to taxi to a dock.A skiff helped the floatplane to reach the dock. Officials were not sure if passengers climbed into the skiff or directly onto the dock.Berntson says the airplane started to sink from the back end and capsized.last_img read more

Congress criticises government on no loan waiver to farmers

first_imgHyderabad: The Congress has criticised the government for not announcing the crop loan waiver to the farmers and alleged that the farmers were forced to borrow from private lenders. Addressing the media, Kisan Cell national vice chairman M Kodanda Reddy and Telangana Kisan Cell chairman Anvesh Reddy said the government was not interested in implementing the promises it has made. Also Read – Educational institutions in TS region ignored in the past: Minister Advertise With Us Kodanda Reddy said the incentive under the Rythu Bandhu scheme did not reach majority of the farmers. While the Kharif sowing season has begun the farmers were deprived of capital. He alleged that Chief Minister K Chandrashekar Rao has forced the farmers to become bonded labourers denting their self-respect. He said with the cleansing of the land records many farmers were at loss. He informed that the number of loan accounts of the farmers was 42.35 lakh and the outstanding loan was Rs 32,266 crore. The number of gold loan accounts was 5.77 lakh and the outstanding loan was Rs 5,252 crore.last_img read more

Cafe Coffee Day owner Siddhartha goes missing

first_imgMangaluru/Bengaluru: India’s biggest coffee chain founder V G Siddhartha was reported missing mysteriously since Monday night en route to Mangaluru city in Karnataka, with an alleged letter by him showing he was under “tremendous pressure” from lenders. Teams of national disaster response force, coast guard, home guard, fire services and coastal police scoured the waters under a bridge across the swollen Nethravathi river, where 60-year old Siddhartha was reportedly last seen, to trace the coffee tycoon. Also Read – Kamal Nath states that there is no struggle over leader’s post in MP Advertise With Us Cafe Coffee Day (CCD) chain owner Siddhartha, also the son-in-law of former Karnataka CM and BJP leader S M Krishna, was last seen near the bridge in the Kotepura area in Dakshina Kannada district on Monday night, police said. Local fisherman, along with their boats, have also joined in the frantic search operations. Siddhartha reportedly asked his driver to take him near the bridge, from where he got down and said he was going for a walk. Also Read – Amrapali case: List of aggrieved homebuyers submitted to Supreme Court Advertise With Us “He (Siddhartha) asked the driver to wait till his arrival. When he did not return even after two hours, the driver approached the police and lodged a missing complaint,” Deputy Commissioner of Dakshina Kannada district Sasikanth Senthil said. In a purported letter to the Board of Directors of his company and “Coffee Day family”, dated July 27, Siddhartha said he had “failed to create the right profitable business model”, and said he was “very sorry to let down all the people that put their trust in me”. Meanwhile, the shares of the coffee chain plunged 20 per cent in early trading on Tuesday. Advertise With Us “I fought for a long time but today I gave up as I could not take any more pressure from one of the private equity partners forcing me to buy back shares, a transaction I partially completed six months ago by borrowing a large sum of money from a friend. Tremendous pressure from other lenders lead to me succumbing to the situation,” Siddhartha wrote. Siddhartha also mentions the “harassment” he allegedly faced at the hands of Income Tax officials. “There was a lot of harassment from the previous DG Income Tax in the form of attaching our shares on two separate occasions to block our MindTree deal and then taking position of our Coffee Day shares, although the revised returns have been filed by us. This was very unfair and has led to a serious liquidity crunch.” In the letter, Siddhartha has also taken responsibility for all financial transactions, which, he said, nobody was aware of. “I sincerely request each of you to be strong and to continue running these businesses with a new management. I am solely responsible for all mistakes. Every financial transaction is my responsibility. My team, auditors and senior management are totally unaware of all my transactions. The law should hold me, and only me accountable, as I have withheld this information from everybody, including my family.” He further wrote: “My intention was never to cheat or mislead anybody. I have failed as an entrepreneur. This is my sincere submission, I hope someday you will understand, forgive and pardon me.” Meanwhile, a spokesperson from the CCD head office in Bengaluru said the company is yet to confirm the genuineness of the letter. “We are still in shock and our employees are still hoping for the best. As of now, we are yet to confirm the genuineness of the letter that is being flashed in the media. We are here to ensure that business will not be hit in any circumstances,” the spokesperson said. There are over 200 policemen and divers on 25 boats searching for Siddhartha at the bridge. Sniffer dogs have also been deployed at the site. “The help of local fishermen is being taken in the search. We are checking who all he spoke to over phone,” Mangaluru Police Commissioner Sandeep Patil said. As 15 hours passed after CCD founder VG Siddhartha went missing, diving experts from the Indian Navy in Karwar have joined to intensify the ongoing search operation. “We had begun search operations last night itself. Over 50 people in 8 boats are now on duty. Two ships from Coast Guard and a helicopter from Goa will be brought in soon,” said Sasikanth Senthil. He is overseeing search operations at Ullal bridge cross the Nethravathi River near Mangalore. read more

Once Upon a Time tweaks its formula going into season six

first_imgBeing a fan of Once Upon a Time has been a series of ups and downs. Sometimes you get a plot arc like last year’s fantastic King Arthur story. Other times you get that weird Frozen cash-in. Sometimes they give us a compelling mystery where the twists and revelations are earned and shocking. Sometimes, they just erase the characters’ memories for a thousandth time.Before a new season starts, that’s one of the tenser moments in OUAT fandom: How will this new season be? Will we get interesting new characters and stories? Or are we in for another 12 weeks of memory loss, mopey Regina, and Henry being an insufferable teenager? This year, we’re also coming off an especially strong fifth season and I’m wondering if the show can pull off that kind of magic twice in a row.Season Five really was something special. In the past when each half-season had its own complete story arc, one was typically much stronger than the other. That wasn’t the case last year. The season opened strong with Emma as The Dark One and King Arthur’s court camping out in Storybrooke. I was so excited to find out what happened, I didn’t even care that they were dragging out the stolen memory device again. The King Arthur storyline provided plenty of intrigue and helped sell it with a charismatic cast of new characters. It may be one of the best half-seasons the show has ever had.Jennifer Morrison as the Dark Swan in Season Five of Once Upon a Time (Photo: Screenshot via ABC)When they went to The Underworld in the second half, I thought  it couldn’t possibly live up to the Dark Swan story. Plus, knowing they were going to bring in Hades from Hercules, there was no way the actor they got was going to top James Woods’s performance from the cartoon. In the end, it didn’t matter. Greg Germann had all the easy charm and startling rage you want from the character, and Emma and Co.’s journey through the Underworld to rescue Hook had me glued to the couch every Sunday.Now, as we prepare for tonight’s premiere, I wonder if Season Six can live up to all that. It’s the same feeling I had after finishing the third season of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Fortunately, there are promising signs already. Things are changing in Storybrooke, which should hopefully make for some great TV. Regina has finally separated herself from the Evil Queen, which will hopefully allow her to find her happy ending soon.Also, if you thought OUAT was running low on fairy tales and Disney movies to bring into Storybrooke, it seems the show’s producers agree. So they’ve brought in characters from classic literature. Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde, The Three Musketeers, and The Count of Monte Cristo will all come to Storybrooke and I can’t wait to see the kind of twist the show puts on these characters.The characters from Aladdin also join the cast this year. If you’re wondering why it took them this long to make that happen, well… The characters previously appeared (played by different actors) in the spinoff series, Once Upon a Time in Wonderland. The less said about that one, the better. This time around, they’ll be fully integrated into the main show. While there will be no Genie (grumble), that at least means we’ll be seeing a wholly different take on the story, which should make for some fun guessing and speculation after each episode.Oded Fehr as Jafar in Once Upon a Time. (Photo: Screenshot via ABC)Honestly, this season could be Once Upon a Time’s most interesting yet. While I’m skeptical that they’ll be able to completely nail it as well as they did last season, the introduction of new kinds of stories and characters that will bring an 1800s steampunk aesthetic to Storybrooke gives me hope. At the very least they’ll add an exciting twist to the OUAT tropes we’ve grown to love. As long as no one loses their memories again (please?), we should be in for a fun ride.last_img read more

Ultrasound Trends and New Technology at RSNA 2015

first_imgRelated content:Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical CareSmart Speaker Technology Harnessed for Hospital Medical Treatments Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Interview with Jon Brubaker, MBA, RCVT, ultrasound technology analyst, MD Buyline, explains the trends and new technology he saw at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015 meeting. Cardio-oncology | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Characterization of Cardiac Structural Changes and Function Following Radiation Therapy Magid Awadalla, MBBS, is an advanced cardiac imaging research fellow at Massachusetts General Hospital. He has been involved in an imaging study of cardiac changes from photon radiotherapy in breast cancer patients using serial cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The radiotherapy beams used to treat breast cancer pass close to the neighboring heart, which can cause cardiac cell damage leading to issues like heart failure later on. He spoke on the topic of cardio-oncology at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting. Recent Videos View all 606 items Artificial Intelligence | April 02, 2019 itnTV “Conversations:” What is Edison? At RSNA 2018, GE Healthcare formally presented Edison as the company’s new applications platform, designed to speed the delivery of precision care.  RSNA | April 03, 2019 VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018 ITN Editor Dave Fornell takes a tour of some of the most interesting new medical imaging technologies displayed on the expo floor at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. The video includes new technologies for fetal ultrasound, CT, MRI, mobile DR X-ray, a new generation of fluoroscopy systems, MRI contrast mapping to better identify tumors, and a new technique to create moving X-ray images from standard DR imaging.Watch the related VIDEO: Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Artificial Intelligence Technologies at RSNA 2018. This inlcudes a tour of some of the recently FDA-cleared AI technologies for medical imaging at RSNA 2018.  Related GE Edison Platform Content:GE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison PlatformVIDEO: itnTV Conversations — What is Edison? Find more SCCT news and videos Technology Reports | April 01, 2018 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017 ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2017 annual meeting.  AI was by far the hottest topic in sessions and on the expo floor at RSNA 2017. Here are links to related deep learning, machine learning coverage:Why AI By Any Name Is Sweet For RadiologyValue in Radiology Takes on Added Depth at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Key Imaging Technology Trends at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Deep Learning is Key Technology Trend at RSNA 2017VIDEO: Machine Learning and the Future of RadiologyVIDEO: Expanding Role for Artificial Intelligence in Medical ImagingHow Artificial Intelligence Will Change Medical Imaging Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Breast Imaging | April 18, 2019 VIDEO: Age, Interval and Other Considerations for Breast Screening In a keynote lecture at the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Diana Miglioretti, Ph.D., dean’s professor of biostatistics at UC Davis Health, discussed risk-stratified breast cancer screening and its potential to improve the balance of screening benefits to harms by tailoring screening intensity and modality to individual risk factors.Read the article “How Risk Stratification Might Affect Women’s Health”Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement”Watch the VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Radiation Oncology | May 13, 2019 Patient-first Innovations from Accuray at ASTRO 2018 At ASTRO 2018, Accuray showcased new patient-first innovations, including motion synchronization on Radixact, and the new CK VoLO, a fast optimizer on the CyberKnife system. Andrew Delao, senior director of marketing for Accuray, highlights the new features. Related content:itnTV “Conversations”: The Accuray Philosophy Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Enterprise Imaging | July 09, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 2 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy.Watch part 1 of the interview at the 2019 Society for Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) conference. Radiation Therapy | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Creating a Low-cost Radiotherapy System for the Developing World Paul Liu, Ph.D., post-doctoral research associate, Image X Institute at the University of Sydney, Australia, explains how his center is working on a low-cost radiation therapy system for the developing world. The Nano-X system will use a fixed linac gantry and rotate the patient around the beam. This would lighten the weight of the system, reduce the need for room shielding, and cut the number iof moving parts to lower costs and ease maintanence. Liu spoke about the project in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: Computed Tomography Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of computed tomography (CT) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. The video includes Freiherr during his booth tours with some of the key vendors who were featuring new technology. Enterprise Imaging | March 27, 2019 VIDEO: GE Healthcare’s CCA Analytics Provides Governance for Enterprise Imaging GE Healthcare Centricity Clinical Archive (CCA) Analytics, shown at RSNA 2018, works directly with the vendor neutral archive (VNA), allowing users to evaluate clinical, financial and operational processes across the healthcare system. The analytics solution shows how all of the different components of the archive and all of the imaging sources — departments, facilities and modalities — are working across the enterprise. Artificial Intelligence | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Machine Learning to Automate Radiotherapy Treatment Planning Leigh Conroy, Ph.D., physics resident, University Health Network, Princess Margaret Cancer Center, Toronto, Canada, explains how her center is using machine learning to automate treatment plans. The center is one of the first to use the RayStation machine learning treatment planning system for radiation oncology. She spoke at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Radiation Oncology View all 91 items Women’s Health | March 25, 2019 VIDEO: Ultrasound Versus MRI for Imaging of the Female Pelvis Deborah Levine, M.D., professor of radiology at Harvard Medical School and vice chair for academic affairs in the Department of Radiology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, describes scenarios where magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be more useful than ultrasound in issues with the female pelvis. Video Player is loading.Play VideoPlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 11:22Loaded: 0.00%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -11:22 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedAudio Trackdefault, selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. 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Related GE Edison Platform Content:VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison PlatformGE Healthcare Unveils New Applications and Smart Devices Built on Edison Platform Technology Reports View all 9 items Related Articles on Y-90 Radiotherapy:Current Advances in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyA Look Ahead in Targeted Radionuclide TherapyRadioactive Bead Therapy Now Used for Head, Neck TumorsNCCN Guidelines Recommend Y-90 Microspheres for Metastatic Colorectal Cancer Treatment CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Enterprise Imaging | April 26, 2019 VIDEO: A Transformative Approach to Reducing Cost and Complexity at CarolinaEast Health System CarolinaEast Health System, an award-winning health system in New Bern, N.C., was one of the first to collaborate with Philips to implement IntelliSpace Enterprise Edition, a comprehensive managed service. Watch the video to see how we collaborated together to streamline workflows and improve interoperability for better care.Watch the related editorial interview VIDEO: Streamlining PACS Administration — Interview with Mike Ciancio, imaging systems administrator at CarolinaEast Health System. Enterprise Imaging | January 14, 2019 Technology Report: Enterprise Imaging 2018 In Enterprise Imaging 2018: Balancing Strategy and Technology in Enterprise Imaging, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of enterprise imaging advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: Implementing CZT SPECT Cardiac Protocols to Reduce Radiation Dose Randy Thompson, M.D., attending cardiologist, St. Luke’s Mid-America Heart Institute, Kansas City, explains protocols and what to consider when working with the newer generation CZT-SPECT camera systems for nuclear cardiology. He spoke during the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today technology update meeting. Watch the related VIDEO “PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology.” Read the related articles “Managing Dose in PET and SPECT Myocardial Perfusion Imaging,”  and “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Conference Coverage View all 396 items Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Videos | Ultrasound Imaging | December 11, 2015 Ultrasound Trends and New Technology at RSNA 2015 Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Technology Report: Digital Radiography Systems Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of digital radiography (DR) advances at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2016 meeting. Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch a technology report sidebar video on new DR Systems technology. Digital Radiography (DR) | October 05, 2016 Agfa Highlights its DR Solutions Agfa highlights how its digital radiography (DR) systems capture analytics data to help improve management of the radiology department, show ROI on DR investments, and explains how its image processing software works.  Read the article “The Coming Push for DR.”  Watch the video “Technology Report: DR Systems.” Radiation Therapy | February 21, 2019 VIDEO: Whole Versus Partial Radiotherapy for Breast Cancer ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Christy Kesslering, M.D., medical director of radiation oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center, about the different radiation therapy options for breast cancer patients offered at the center.Watch the VIDEOs Advancements in Radiation Therapy for Brain Cancer and Multidisciplinary Treatment of Brain Tumors with Vinai Gondi, M.D., director of research and CNS neuro-oncology at the Northwestern Medicine Cancer Center.Additional videos and coverage of Northwestern Medicine Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos Nuclear Imaging | March 22, 2019 VIDEO: Utilization of PET For Evaluation of Cardiac Sarcoidosis Raza Alvi, M.D., a research fellow in radiology at Massachusetts General Hospital, has been involved in a study of a positron-emission tomography (PET) FDG radiotracer agent to image sarcoidosis. The inflammatory disease affects multiple organs and usually include abnormal masses or nodules (granulomas) consisting of inflamed tissues that can form in the heart. Alvi presented on this topic at American College of Cardiology (ACC) 2019 meeting.  Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) | January 08, 2016 RSNA Technology Report 2015: MRI Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2015. Below is related MRI content:RSNA Technology Report 2015: Magnetic Resonance ImagingRecent Advances in MRI TechnologySoftware Advances in MRI TechnologyAdvances in Cardiac Imaging at RSNA 2016Recent Trends and Developments in Contrast MediaComparison Chart: MRI Wide Bore Systems (chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: MRI Contrast Agents(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register)Comparison Chart: Cardiovascular MRI Analysis Software(chart access will require a login, but is free and only takes a minute to register) Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Nuclear Imaging | August 24, 2017 VIDEO: PET vs. SPECT in Nuclear Cardiology and Recent Advances in Technology Prem Soman, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at the Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh, and president-elect of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explained advances in PET and SPECT imaging and the learning curve involved in reading scans from the new CZT SPECT cameras. Watch the VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging, an iknterview with David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida. Read the related article “Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging.” Related Cardiac Sarcoidosis Content:ASNC and SNMMI Release Joint Document on Diagnosis, Treatment of Cardiac SarcoidosisNew PET-CT Scan Improves Detection in Rare Cardiac Condition25 Most Impactful Nuclear Cardiology ArticlesRecent Advances in Cardiac Nuclear Imaging Technology Artificial Intelligence | January 15, 2019 Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2018 In Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AI, ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr offers an overview of artificial intelligence (AI) advances at the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) 2018 annual meeting. Computed Tomography (CT) | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: New Advances in CT Imaging Technology Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic CT Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), shares her insights on the latest advances in computed tomography (CT) imaging technology. She spoke at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She also did an interview at AAPM on her president’s theme for the 2019 meeting – VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care.Find more news and videos from AAPM. Mammography | April 15, 2019 VIDEO: A Discussion on Proposed FDA Rules for Mammography Reporting Wendie Berg, M.D., Ph.D., FACR, chief scientific advisor to DenseBreast-info.org and professor of radiology at University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine/Magee-Women’s Hospital of UPMC, spoke with ITN Editorial Director Melinda Taschetta-Millane about some of the proposed amendments to the language being used for mammography reporting and quality improvement.Read the article “FDA Proposes New Rules for Mammography Reporting and Quality Improvement” Advanced Visualization | April 01, 2019 VIDEO: The GE iCenter Looks Toward the Future of New Technologies GE Healthcare goes beyond core equipment maintenance to help clients solve some of their most important asset and clinical performance challenges through digital solutions.center_img Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Women’s Health View all 62 items AAPM | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., director of the Mayo Clinic Computed Tomography (CT) Clinical Innovation Center, professor of medical physics and biomedical engineering, and the 2019 president of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains the “building bridges” theme of the 2019 AAPM meeting. This theme was the focus of her president’s address at the 2019 AAPM meeting. She spoke on the theme of diversity and how to break down the barriers between various minorities, male-female, religion, national origin, etc. She gave many photo examples of how we pigeon hole people into neat categories and that we often say we have equally in society, however her images showed recent images of big political summits where there are no women present, or they were the secretaries in the background. She said in medical practice, department administration and collaboration on projects, people need to be cognoscente of bias they have engrained by culture for which they may not even be aware.She showed a slide of the AAPM membership makeup by generation and said members need to keep in mind the way each generation thinks and communicates varies by their generation’s life experience and upbringing. McCollough said understanding these differences can help bridge perceived gaps in communication. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Nuclear Imaging | April 28, 2017 VIDEO: Trends in Nuclear Cardiology Imaging David Wolinsky, M.D., director of nuclear cardiology at Cleveland Clinic Florida and past-president of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), discusses advancements in nuclear imaging and some of the issues facing the subspecialty. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Sponsored Videos View all 142 items Radiology Business | May 03, 2017 VIDEO: MACRA’s Impact on Cardiology Kim A. Williams, Sr., M.D., chief of cardiology at Rush University Medical Center, Chicago and former president of both the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC), explains the impact of healthcare reform on cardiology and specifically on nuclear perfusion imaging.  SPECT-CT | December 12, 2018 VIDEO: Walk Around of the Veriton SPECT-CT System This is a walk around of the new Spectrum Dynamics Veriton SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system introduced at the 2018 Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) meeting. This is a walk around of an innovative new SPECT-CT nuclear imaging system shown at the Radiological Society Of North America (RSNA) 2018 meeting this week. It’s CT system with comes in 16, 64 or 128 slice configurations. It has 12 SPECT detector robotic arms that automatically move toward the patient and use a sensor to stop a few millimeters from the skin to optimize photon counts and SPECT image quality. It also uses more sensitive CZT digital detectors, which allows either faster scan times, or use of only half the radiotracer dose of analog detector scans.Read the article “Nuclear Imaging Moves Toward Digital Detector Technology.” Read the article “Spectrum Dynamics Sues GE for Theft, Misappropriation of Trade Secrets and Unfair Competition.” Artificial Intelligence | April 17, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence in Radiology — Are We Doomed? At the Society of Breast Imaging (SBI)/American College of Radiology (ACR) 2019 Symposium, Rasu Shrestha, M.D., MBA, chief strategy officer for Atrium Health, discusses his new role with Atrium, the hype cycle of artificial intelligence (AI) and the key elements of getting AI in radiology — and in healthcare — right.Read the article “Atrium Health Debuts Amazon Alexa Skill to Help Patients Access Medical Care”Listen to the podcast Is Artificial Intelligence The Doom of Radiology?, a discussion with Shrestha. Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiology Imaging View all 288 items Interventional Radiology | October 19, 2018 VIDEO: Y90 Embolization of Liver Cancer at Henry Ford Hospital Scott Schwartz, M.D., interventional radiologist and program director for IR residencies and the vascular and interventional radiology fellowship at Henry Ford Hospital, explains how the department uses Yttrium-90 (Y90) embolization therapy to treat liver cancer.Find more content on Henry Ford Hospital Information Technology | April 17, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Creating an Interoperability Strategy With Intellispace Enterprise Edition as the foundation, Philips Healthcare is connecting facilities and service areas within enterprises, while developing standards-based interoperability that preserves customers’ investments and best of breed systems.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: The History of CT Calcium Scoring Arthur Agatston, M.D., clinical professor of medicine, Florida International University, Herbert Wertheim College of Medicine, is the name-sake of the Agatston score used in CT calcium scoring. He explains the history of the scoring system from the early 1990s and the evolution of CT technology for cardiac imaging. The latest American Heart Association (AHA) 2018 cholesterol guidelines now include the use of CT calcium scoring, which was a big topic at the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. Artificial Intelligence | March 28, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence – GE Builds AI Applications on Edison Platform GE launched a new brand that covers artificial intelligence (AI) at the Radiological Socoety of North American (RSNA) 2018 meeting. The company showed several works-in-progress, including a critical care suite of algorithms and experimental applications for brain MR. Each is being built on GE’s Edison Platform. Radiation Therapy | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Use of Radiotherapy to Noninvasively Ablate Ventricular Tachycardia Pierre Qian, MBBS, cardiac electrophysiologist fellow, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, explains how his facility is working with radiation oncology to use radio therapy to noninvasively ablate ventricular tachycardia (VT). He spoke on this topics during a joint electrophysiology session by the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the SCCT 2019 meeting.Find more SCCT news and videos CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Radiation Oncology | July 22, 2019 VIDEO: Use of a Fully Self-contained Brain Radiotherapy System Stephen Sorensen, Ph.D., DABR, chief of medical physics, St. Joseph’s Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix, Arizona, explains the first commercial use of the Zap-X stereotactic radio surgery (SRS) brain radiotherapy system. The system uses a capsule-like shield to surround the gantry and patient, eliminating the need for expensive room build outs requiring vaults. The goal of the system is to expand SRS brain therapy by making it easier and less expensive to acquire the treatment system. Sorensen spoke about this system in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Molecular Imaging View all 22 items Information Technology | April 15, 2019 itnTV “Conversations”: Vital Images Helps Build Infrastructure for the Future Vital Images has developed a strategy that allows its customers to capture revenues that are otherwise missed while building the infrastructure for the future. In an interview with itnTV, Vital Images executives Larry Sitka and Geoffrey Clemmons describe how the company has reconciled this vision of the future with near-term realities. Find more news and videos from AAPM. Find more SCCT news and videos Brachytherapy Systems | July 23, 2019 VIDEO: New Alpha Emitter Brachytherapy Seeds in Development Lior Arazi, Ph.D., assistant professor at Ben-Gurion University, Israel, explains the potential benefits of a new Radium-224 brachytherapy seed technology he is helping develop. The technology uses high-dose alpha particles to kill cancer cells, but has a very short tissue penetration, so it can be placed very close to critical structures without causing collateral damage to healthy tissue. He discussed this technology in sessions at the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) 2019 meeting. Radiation Therapy | December 06, 2018 Technology Report: Patient-centered Care in Radiation Therapy Radiation therapy has become increasingly effective and safe as vendors continue to innovate technologies that benefit the patient. At ASTRO 2018, this patient-centric approach was exemplified and demonstrated not only in ways that match treatments to patients, but in how technologies can adjust to patient movement and anatomical changes, and to increase the precision of treatments. ITN Contributing Editor Greg Freiherr showcases several new technologies that are helping to advance this field.For additional patient-centered care coverage, see:Conversations with Greg Freiherr: The Accuray PhilosophyASTRO Puts Patients First CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Trends in Medical Physics at the AAPM 2019 meeting Mahadevappa Mahesh, Ph.D., chief of medical physicist and professor of radiology and medical physics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and treasurer of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM), explains some of the trends in medical physics and new features of the AAPM 2019 meeting. Watch the related VIDEO: Bridging Diversity in Medical Physics to Improve Patient Care — Interview with AAPM President Cynthia McCollough, Ph.D., at the 2019 AAPM meeting. Artificial Intelligence | July 12, 2019 VIDEO: The Economics of Artificial Intelligence Khan Siddiqui, M.D., founder and CEO of HOPPR, discusses the economic advantages and costs presented by artificial intelligence (AI) applications in radiology, as well as potential strategies for healthcare providers looking to add AI to their armamentarium, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting. CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a GE Cardiographe Dedicated Cardiac CT Scanner This is a quick walk around of the GE Healthcare Cardiographe dedicated cardiac CT system on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting. It was designed specifically for cardiac imaging and so has a very compact footprint so it can be used in an office setting or small room. It offers a fast gantry rotation speed to freeze cardiac motion and has large enough anatomical coverage to view the scan the entire heart in one rotation.One of these systems was recently installed at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, Canada, where they have an extensive structural heart program. Read more about this intall.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Clinical Decision Support | June 29, 2017 VIDEO: Clinical Decision Support Requirements for Cardiac Imaging Rami Doukky, M.D., system chair, Division of Cardiology, professor of medicine, Cook County Health and Hospitals System, Chicago, discusses the new CMS requirements for clinical decision support (CDS) appropriate use criteria (AUC) documentation in cardiac imaging starting on Jan. 1, 2018. He spoke at the 2017 American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) Today meeting. Read the article “CMS to Require Appropriate Use Criteria Documentation for Medical Imaging Orders.” Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEOS | EP LAB | JULY 26, 2019 VIDEO: What Electrophysiologists Need From CT Imaging Prior to AF and VT Ablations Mark Ibrahim, M.D., FACC, assistant professor of medicine and radiology, associate program director, advanced cardiac imaging fellowship, University of Utah, explains what radiologists and cardiologists need to know what is needed from CT imaging prior to ablation procedures for atrial fibrillation (AF) and ventricular fibrillation (VF). He spoke at a joint session of the Heart Rhythm Society (HRS) and the Society of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) at the 2019 SCCT meeting.  Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Radiographic Fluoroscopy (RF) | August 09, 2019 VIDEO: Demonstration of the Shimadzu FluoroSpeed X1 Radiographic Fluoroscopy System Shimadzu displayed the FluoroSpeed X1 conventional radiographic fluoroscopy (RF) system at the Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) 2019 meeting in July. The system was pending U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval at AHRA, but received FDA 510(k) clearance in early August 2019.The system features a 33-inch aperture, large enough to place a wheelchair inside. It can be rotated 90 degrees in either direction and the deck can be parked in any position, making it easier for patients to get on and off the 660-pound weight table. The FluoroSpeed X1 offers controls that are ergonomic for technologists, with duplicate controls on each side for either a left- or right-handed tech. The machine also has a large aperture to allow swallow studies.The FluoroSpeed X1 comes equipped with a 17 x 17-inch dynamic digital X-ray detector (FPD) in the table bucky, allowing it to both be used for fluoroscopy as well as radiographic exams.Read more about the FluoroSpeed X1:Shimadzu Medical Systems Receives FDA 510(k) for FluoroSpeed X1 RF System Find more SCCT news and videos Find more SCCT news and videos Digital Pathology | July 11, 2019 VIDEO: Integrating Digital Pathology With Radiology Toby Cornish, M.D., Ph.D., associate professor and medical director of informatics at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, explains how the subspecialty of digital pathology has evolved in recent years, the benefits of integrating pathology and radiology, and how artificial intelligence (AI) may smooth the transition, at the 2019 Society of Imaging Informatics in Medicine (SIIM) annual meeting.  CT Angiography (CTA) | August 07, 2019 VIDEO: Walk Around of a Siemens Go.Top Dedicated Cardiac Scanner This is a quick walk around of the new Siemens Somatom Go.top cardiovascular edition compact computed tomography (CT) scanner on display at the Society Of Cardiovascular Computed Tomography (SCCT) 2019 meeting in July. It is aimed at cardiology office based imaging and was released this past spring at the American College of Cardiology (ACC) meeting.The system has removable tablets on each side of the scanner where the tech can adjust the machine, review scout scans and trigger the scanner. The idea is to improve workflow and allow the tech to remain at the bedside longer to be with the patient, rather tucked away in a remote control room using an intercom.The entire system is built into the gantry seen here, so there is no need for extra equipment in a closet, cabinet or server tower.It comes in a 128 slice configuration with 4 cm of anatomical coverage per rotation.It uses the Stellar detector and tin filtration to eliminate low energy photons and help lower dose. It can be programmed to aid workflow by automatically removing bone, create cured planar reconstructions, lung CAD and other post-processing features so more time can be spent on reading scans. The scanner also comes with a HeartFlow FFR-CT starter pack.Find more information on this system in these related articles:New Cardiovascular CT Technology Entering the MarketNew Technology Highlights on the ACC 2019 Exhibit Floor Related Enterprise Imaging Content:RSNA Technology Report 2017: Enterprise ImagingVIDEO: Building An Effective Enterprise Imaging StrategyFive Steps for Better Diagnostic Image ManagementVIDEO: Enterprise Imaging and the Digital Imaging Adoption ModelEnterprise Imaging to Account for 27 Percent of Imaging MarketVIDEO: Defining Enterprise Imaging — The HIMSS-SIIM Enterprise Imaging WorkgroupVIDEO: How to Build An Enterprise Imaging System Find more SCCT news and videos Interventional Radiology | June 26, 2019 VIDEO: How Alexa Might Help During Interventional Radiology Procedures Kevin Seals, M.D., University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Health, interventional radiology fellow, is working on a research project using smart speakers such as the Amazon Echo and Google Home to create a new method for accessing information on device technologies in real time in the interventional radiology (IR) lab. Operators can use the conversational voice interface to retrieve information without breaking sterile scrub. The technology uses using natural language processing (NLP) and machine learning to rapidly provide information about device sizing and compatibility in IR.Seals spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference in Chicago in June. Related CT Technology Content:New CT Technology Entering the MarketVIDEO: Advances in Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with David Bluemke, M.D.Expanding Applications for Computed TomographyVIDEO: Overview of Cardiac CT Trends and 2019 SCCT Meeting Highlights —Interview with Ron Blankstein, M.D., directVIDEO: 10 Tips to Improve Cardiac CT Imaging — Interview with Quynh Truong, M.D.FFR-CT: Is It Radiology or Cardiology?VIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of the Most Innovative New Technology at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Using Advanced CT to Enhance Radiation Therapy Planning — Interview with Carri Glide-Hurst, Ph.D.VIDEO: Tips and Tricks to Aid Cardiac CT Technologist WorkflowManaging CT Radiation DoseVIDEO: ITN Editor’s Choice of Most Innovative New Cardiac CT Technology at SCCT 2017New Developments in Cardiovascular Computed Tomography at SCCT 2017VIDEO: Role of Cardiac CT in Value-based Medicine — Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.Advances in Cardiac Imaging Technologies at RSNA 2017VIDEO: The Future of Cardiac CT in the Next Decade — Interview with Leslee Shaw, Ph.D.VIDEO: What to Consider When Comparing 64-slice to Higher Slice CT Systems — Interview with Claudio Smuclovisky, M.D.  Related Artificial Intelligence ContentTechnology Report: Artificial Intelligence 2017VIDEO: RSNA Post-game Report on Artificial IntelligenceVIDEO: AI in Tumor Diagnostics, Treatment and Follow-upVIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Help Reduce Gadolinium Dose in MRIVIDEO: AI, Analytics and Informatics: The Future is Here Artificial Intelligence | July 03, 2019 VIDEO: Artificial Intelligence May Assist in Pediatric Imaging Sudhen Desai, M.D., FSIR, interventional radiologist at Texas Children’s Hospital, editor of IR Quarterly for the Society of Interventional Radiology (SIR) and on the Board of Directors for the Society of Physician Entrepreneurs, explained how artificial intelligence (AI) can assist in pediatric imaging and the pitfalls of training AI systems. He spoke at the 2019 Radiology AIMed conference. Deep learning algorithms require large amounts of patient case data to train the systems to read medical images automatically without human intervention. However, in pediatrics, there are often much lower numbers of normal and abnormal scans that can be used compared to vast amounts of adult exams available. This makes it difficult to train systems, so AI developers are coming up with innovative new ways to train their software. Compounding issues with training pediatric imaging AI is that the normal ranges change very quickly for young children due to their rapid development. He explained what is normal for a 2-year-old may not be normal for a 5-year-old.Desai and other pediatric physicians who spoke at the conference said AI could have a big impact on pediatric imaging where there are not enough specialists for the increasing image volumes. Cardiac Imaging | July 30, 2019 VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes Nate Bachman, graduate research assistant in the Human Cardiovascular Physiology Lab of the Dept. of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University, describes how he and fellow researchers used multiple types of cardiac imaging to evaluate the health of athletes who compete in endurance events lasting six hours or more, and what the results may suggest for future screening.Watch the VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019, an interview with AHRA President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA. Related CT Calcium Scorining Content:VIDEO: New Cholesterol Guidelines Support CT Calcium Scoring for Risk Assessment — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D.CT Calcium Scoring Becoming a Key Risk Factor AssessmentACC and AHA Release Updated Cholesterol Guidelines for 2018VIDEO: CT Calcium Scoring to Screen For Who Should Take Statins — Interview with Matthew Budoff, M.D. Related content:VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice — Interview with Lawrence Tanenbaum, M.D.VIDEO: AI That Second Reads Radiology Reports and Deals With Incidental Findings — Interview with Nina Kottler, M.D.Technology Report: Artificial Intelligence at RSNA 2018VIDEO: Implementation of Artificial Intelligence Tools in Radiology Practice Enterprise Imaging | July 08, 2019 VIDEO: Building the Right Team for Enterprise Imaging Success — Part 1 ITN Associate Editor Jeff Zagoudis speaks with Don Dennison, healthcare IT consultant and Chris Roth, M.D., associate professor of radiology, vice chair, information technology and clinical informatics, and director of imaging informatics strategy at Duke University Medical Center, about how to find the right people to deploy a successful enterprise imaging strategy. Information Technology View all 220 items Radiology Business | August 02, 2019 VIDEO: Key Topics for Radiology Administrators at AHRA 2019 Association for Medical Imaging Management (AHRA) President Chris Tomlinson, CRA, FAHRA, and President-elect Jacqui Rose, CRA, FAHRA, discuss some of the most important clinical topics at the 2019 AHRA Annual Meeting and how the association plans to help its members embrace technological change in the coming years. Among the main focuses at the meeting were clinical decision support (CDS), artificial intelligence (AI) and the use of data analytics to improve equipment and personnel performance. Watch the VIDEO: Assessing Cardiovascular Risk in Ultra-endurance Athletes, an interview with Colorado State University graduate research assistant Nate Bachman at AHRA 2019. Artificial Intelligence | March 13, 2019 VIDEO: How iCad Uses AI to Speed Breast Tomosynthesis At RSNA 2018, iCad showed how its ProFound AI for digital breast tomosynthesis technology might help in the interpretation of tomosynthesis exams. Rodney Hawkins, vice president of marketing for iCad, discusses how this technology can better help detect the cancer.Related content:Artificial Intelligence 2018: What Radiologists Need to Know About AIRSNA 2018 Sunday – Improving, Not Replacing AAPM | July 29, 2019 VIDEO: Efforts to Define the Roles of Medical Physicists and Assistants for Regulators Brent Parker, Ph.D., DABR, professor of radiation physics and medical physicist at MD Anderson Cancer Center, explains how the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) is creating guidelines to better define the roles of non-physicist assistants. He said there is a lack of state regulatory oversight for medical physicists or their assistants, partly because there are no guidelines from the medical societies. AAPM has created a series of policy statements to better define these the roles and requirements for all of these positions. Parker said the goal is to give state regulators the the definitions needed to create oversight guidelines. He spoke on this topic in sessions at the AAPM 2019 meeting. Find more news and videos from AAPM.last_img read more

Rabin killer to leave solitary cell in Israel

first_img New high school in Mesa lets students pick career paths 5 treatments for adult scoliosis Sponsored Stories Arizona families, Arizona farms: A legacy of tradition embracing animal care and comfort through modern technology Think Tank analyzes the second round of Democratic debates Top ways to honor our heroes on Veterans Day Top Stories center_img Meghan McCain to release audiobook on conservatism, family More Valley freeways to be closed this weekend for improvements Comments   Share   JERUSALEM (AP) – Israeli officials say Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin’s assassin will be taken out of solitary confinement for the first time since his arrest 17 years ago.Prisons service spokeswoman Sivan Weizman says ultranationalist Jewish extremist Yigal Amir will leave his solitary cell in the next few days in line with a court order earlier this year.The court ruled the reasons for keeping him separate are no longer valid. In the past, Amir was isolated for fear he would disseminate his views to others. Amir opposed Rabin’s efforts at peacemaking with the Palestinians and has never expressed remorse for gunning him down after a peace rally on Nov. 4, 1995.Officials also thought in the past that he should be kept in solitary confinement for fear other prisoners might harm him.(Copyright 2012 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.)last_img read more

New head of Jetset retail

first_imgJulie Primmer has taken the reins of the Jetset Travelworld retail network from Warwick Blacker who has been appointed as Senior Advisor for Jetset Travelworld Limited (JTG) this morning.JTG chief executive Peter Lacaze announced the changes in a letter this morning and advised that both Ms Primmer and Mr Blacker will report to him in their new roles.The shift in roles will see Mr Blacker manage “a number of important external customer relationships”, assist the Commercial team with “key supplier relationships” and ensure a smooth transition to Ms Primmer.“Warwick will also remain as a director of AFTA until the Federal Government review of consumer protection and agent regulation in the Australian travel industry is concluded, or at least heading in a clear direction,” Mr Lacaze wrote.Mr Lacaze thanked Mr Blacker for “the very good job he has done” and praised his replacement.“Julie has a real depth of knowledge and experience in the retail travel sector, and has been working at Jetset Travelworld in a number of senior sales roles over the past seven years. “She is well known and trusted by network members, staff and key suppliers and I am confident that she will do a great job.” Source = e-Travel Blackboard: G.Alast_img read more

Are Tango mandarins beefriendly Not according

first_img Are Tango mandarins ‘bee-friendly’? Not according … NZ horticultural export value grows to NZ$5.5B … The impact of digital marketing in the avocado ind … California citrus: “A lot of unusual dynamics” in … You might also be interested in South Africa has hit back at Donald Trump who recently twitted about the country’s land reform policy and the “large-scale killing” of farmers.On Wednesday Trump said he had asked Secretary of State Mike Pompeo “to closely study the South Africa land and farm seizures and expropriations and the large scale [sic] killing of farmers.””The presidency has noted Trump’s tweet, which is misinformed in our view,” South African President Cyril Ramaphosa’s spokeswoman Khusela Diko was quoted as saying on Thursday.”South Africa totally rejects this narrow perception, which only seeks to divide our nation and reminds us of our colonial past,” a tweet by the president’s office said. “South Africa will speed up the pace of land reform in a careful and inclusive manner that does not divide our nation.”Diko said South Africa’s foreign minister will ask the U.S. ambassador for clarification.Land reform in South Africa has recently emerged as a dominant and potentially explosive issue. A South African cabinet minister reportedly said Trump’s message will not affect future relations between the two countries.”The tweet has not determined our approach to the United States on our current relationship and future relationship,” communications minister Nomvula Mokonyane told reporters.Ramaphosa on August 1 announced the ruling African National Congress (ANC) is forging ahead with plans to change the constitution to allow the expropriation of land without compensation.South African grower association last week called for ‘meaningful and sustainable’ land reform, while farming organization Agri SA said it was “deeply concerned” about the issue. August 23 , 2018 I have asked Secretary of State @SecPompeo to closely study the South Africa land and farm seizures and expropriations and the large scale killing of farmers. “South African Government is now seizing land from white farmers.” @TuckerCarlson @FoxNews— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) August 23, 2018last_img read more

Outrigger Resorts newlylaunched range of nine ho

first_imgOutrigger Resorts’ newly-launched range of nine honeymoon packages in some of the most desirable honeymoon destinations in the world – Maldives, Mauritius, Hawaii, Fiji, Guam, Phuket and Koh Samui – is available for all of its Pacific, Asian and Indian Ocean beachfront resorts.Each Outrigger “Honeymoon Getaway Package” is customised to the host location; standard inclusions typically feature breakfast in bed, romantic flower decorations and a selection of rich chocolates or a chilled bottle of sparkling wine. Newlyweds visiting Outrigger Konotta Maldives Resort would enjoy a dreamy sunset cruise with cocktails and canapés or at Outrigger Mauritius Beach Resort an extraordinary honeymoon dinner on the beach and a 30-minute couple’s massage; at Fiji’s Castaway Island a sundown cruise and Swedish massage are included; VIP Mercedes-Benz airport transfers to and from Outrigger Laguna Phuket Beach Resort.Newlywed honeymoon couples can also join Outrigger Resorts’ beachfront vow renewal ceremonies at each Outrigger Resort. For the “Honeymoon Getaway” and “Ultimate Honeymoon” packages, each Outrigger resort requires a minimum stay between three to five nights, depending on the destination. The travel period for the honeymoon packages at all Outrigger Resorts is through December 31, 2018. Guests must provide proof that their marriage date occurred less than one year prior to arrival.Full details, terms and conditions are available HERE. honeymoonMaldivesmauritiusOutriggerPacificthailandlast_img read more