Gardai investigate damage to solar panels at student apartments

first_imgVandals have damaged six solar panels on a block of student accommodation in Letterkenny.The damage to the student block on the Port Road close to the Polestar Roundabout was caused before August 22nd.The block is currently being renovated and is due to house a number of students for the new college year. Gardai have appealed for anybody who knows about the incident or who may have seen anybody acting suspiciously near the accommodation to contact Letterkenny Gardai.Gardai investigate damage to solar panels at student apartments was last modified: August 27th, 2019 by StephenShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window)last_img read more

We Calculated How Much Trees Save for Your City

first_imgIs It Time to Move Our Cities?Healthy People Live With TreesDenver’s Green Roof Ordinance Kicks In Theodore Endreny is a professor in the Department of Environmental Resources Engineering at the State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry. This post originally appeared at The Conversation. RELATED ARTICLES Megacities are on the rise. There are currently 47 such areas around the globe, each housing more than 10 million residents.More than half the global population now lives in urban areas, comprising about 3% of the Earth. The ecological footprint of this growth is vast and there’s far more that can be done to improve life for urban residents around the world.When it comes to natural spaces, trees are keystone species in the urban ecosystem, providing a number of services that benefit people. My research team has calculated just how much a tree matters for many urban areas, particularly megacities. Trees clean the air and water, reduce stormwater floods, improve building energy use and mitigate climate change, among other things.For every dollar invested in planting, cities see an average $2.25 return on their investment each year. How tree density affects a city We looked in detail at 10 megacities around the world, including Beijing, Cairo, Mexico City, Los Angeles, and London. These megacities are distributed across five continents and represent different natural habitats. Cairo was the smallest, at 1,173 square kilometers, while Tokyo measured in at a whopping 18,720.For most cities, we looked at Google Maps aerial imagery, randomly selecting 500 points and classifying each as tree canopy, grass, shrub, and so on.We calculated that tree cover was linked to significant cost savings. Each square kilometer saved about $0.93 million in air pollution health care costs, $20,000 by capturing water runoff, and $478,000 in building energy heating and cooling savings.What’s more, the median annual value of carbon dioxide sequestered by megacity tree cover was $7.9 million. That comes out to about $17,000 per square kilometer. The total CO2 stored was valued at $242 million, using a measure called the social cost of carbon.The sum of all annual services provided by the megacity trees had a median annual value of $505 million. That provides a median value of $967,000 per square kilometer of tree cover.center_img These tools simulate the relationship between trees and ecosystem services they provide. These services can include food, clean air and water, climate and flood control, pollination, recreation, and noise damping. We currently don’t simulate many services, so our calculations actually underestimate the value of urban trees.Our software can simulate how a tree’s structure — such as height, canopy size, and leaf area — affects the services it provides. It can estimate how trees will reduce water flooding; or explore how trees will affect air quality, building energy use, and air pollution levels in their community. It can also allow users to inventory trees in their own area.Our systematic aerial surveys of 35 megacities suggest that 20% of the average megacity’s urban core is covered by forest canopy. But this can vary greatly. Trees cover just 1% of Lima, Peru, versus 36% in New York City.We wanted to determine how much trees contribute to human well-being in the places where humans are most concentrated, and nature perhaps most distant. In addition, we wanted to calculate how many additional trees could be planted in each megacity to improve the quality of life. Trees in your cityAn entire urban forest can provide services for a good life.All of the cities we studied had the potential to add additional trees, with about 18 percent of the metropolitan area on average available. Potential spots included areas with sidewalks, parking lots and plaza areas. The tree’s canopy could extend above the human-occupied area, with the trunk positioned to allow for pedestrian passage or parking.Want to conserve forests and plant more trees in your area? Everyone can take action. City and regional planners can continue to incorporate the planning for urban forests. Those who are elected to office can continue to share a vision that the urban forest is an important part of the community, and they can advocate and support groups that are looking to increase it.Individuals who cannot plant a tree might add a potted shrub, which is smaller than a tree but has a leafy canopy that can contribute similar benefits. For the property owner wanting to take charge, our i-Tree software can assist with selecting a tree type and location. A local arborist or urban forester could also help. Measuring treesOur team, led by Dr. David Nowak of the USDA Forest Service and Scott Maco of Davey Institute, develops the tree benefits software i-Tree Tools.last_img read more

Practicing Emotional First Aid: Maintaining Our Psychological Health

first_img Return to article. Long DescriptionPixabay[First Aid Box Tin Can by Alexa_Fotos on October 11, 2016, CCO]Many of us prioritize our physical health, especially this time of year as we go through flu season once again. We get the sniffles and the sneezes, with the soon to be congestion and fever. And if you didn’t get your flu shot, you soon wind up in your local doctor’s office or urgent care, hoping for some much needed meds, a doctor’s note, and some sick days.When we are physically sick or hurt, it’s a no-brainer to take care of ourselves. But what about our psychological health? Is it okay to take time off when we are anxious, depressed, or emotionally overwhelmed? Why is our physical health seemingly so much more important than our psychological health?This TED Talk features Dr. Guy Winch, a licensed psychologist who works with individuals, couples, and families. Dr. Winch proposes that we start prioritizing our mental health just as much as our physical health. And the way he says to do this is to practice emotional first aid. In his work with clients, he has emphasized the need to practice mental and emotional hygiene, stressing that it is equally as important as practicing physical and dental hygiene.Some key points he makes in his presentation are:• We are confronted with psychological injuries much more often than we are with physical ones. These are injuries such as failure, rejection, and loneliness.• To be aware of feelings of helplessness that arise.• We should pay attention to the emotional pain we experience and recognize this pain is trying to tell us something.• We are our own worse critic when faced with rejection or failure. He suggests treating yourself with the same compassion that you would expect from a truly good friend when they are trying to comfort and boost you up.• That we must protect our self-esteem by noticing these unhealthy psychological habits and explore what they are trying to tell us.• Also, that ruminating thoughts come and go. A two minute distraction is enough to break the urge to ruminate in any given moment.These issues are all ones we face on a daily basis and are common barriers for both civilians and military service members alike. For more on practicing emotional first aid, be sure to watch Dr. Winch’s full TED Talk here. And for more about mental health barriers in the military, be sure to catch the archived recording of our “Staying Strong by Seeking Help” webinar. CEUs are still available through April, 19, 2019.ReferencesWinch, G. (2014). Why We All Need to Practice Emotional First Aid. TED Talk. Retrieved from: https://www.ted.com/talks/guy_winch_the_case_for_emotional_hygiene#t-108616This post was written by Jason M. Jowers, MS, MFT, of the MFLN Family Development Team. The Family Development team aims to support the development of professionals working with military families. Find out more about the Military Families Learning Network Family Development concentration on our website, Facebook, and Twitter.  You can also listen to our Anchored. podcast series via iTunes and our website. Pixabay[First Aid Box Tin Can by Alexa_Fotos on October 11, 2016, CCO] By: Jason M. Jowers, MS, MFTlast_img read more

The Death of the Economic Buyer

first_imgThere is no longer an economic buyer. Just as the power sponsor has been replaced by power sponsors (plural), there are now economic buyers (also plural).Every stakeholder is responsible for a line on the profit and loss report, is being asked to make a greater financial contribution to their organization, and is being charged with managing their costs.You have to be able to respond to concerns about price with answers about costs.You have to be able to help translate the value you create to improved performance, and ultimately, to improved financial performance.You have to be an educator, teaching your clients about the unseen soft costs that, while not possessing their own line on a profit and loss statement, wreak havoc on the bottom line.And perhaps most importantly, you are going to have to be able to equip the economic buyers in your client’s organization to defend the investment that they are making in your solution.The economic buyer is dead. Long live the economic buyers. Essential Reading! Get my 3rd book: Eat Their Lunch “The first ever playbook for B2B salespeople on how to win clients and customers who are already being serviced by your competition.” Buy Nowlast_img read more