a month agoLampard: Why it didn’t work at Chelsea for Salah

first_imgLampard: Why it didn’t work at Chelsea for Salahby Paul Vegasa month agoSend to a friendShare the loveChelsea boss Frank Lampard admits he knew Liverpool striker Mohamed Salah was destined for bigger things when they played together.Salah moved to Stamford Bridge in 2014 but struggled for game time under Jose Mourinho and made just 19 appearances for the club before joining Roma.Lampard was a team-mate of the Egyptian for six months before his own Chelsea career came to an end that summer.”Unfortunately for Mo, it didn’t work out here but it is great credit to him. He went to Italy and then came back and now he’s a superstar,” said Lampard.”As for his path, it’s hard to compare what might have been. The talent was obviously there.”At the time, I think we had a lot of options in attacking areas. Number 10s, wingers, and he didn’t get as many opportunities for whatever reason, but yes, you could see the talent was there.”But the player that he is now, or that came back to Liverpool, I think you have to say huge credit is due. You don’t have to search for anything more than look at Mo himself.”You have to say what professionalism and work ethic, to leave a club like Chelsea is not easy.”People then cast you aside and say you won’t make it there. He went on to be the superstar he is now. It is completely credit to Mo himself.” TagsTransfersAbout the authorPaul VegasShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Game 7 is a Great Time to Get Physical

The Bruins fired their outspoken coach, Don Cherry, after the season. Cherry coached the next year for the Colorado Rockies. After they finished dead last in the NHL — their slogan had been, “Come to the fights and watch a Rockies game break out!” — CBC hired Cherry as a broadcaster. His “Coaches’ Corner” segment debuted the next year and has aired on CBC ever since. Cherry is so legendary to fans of “Hockey Night in Canada” that he was once voted the seventh-greatest Canadian of all time. Alexander Graham Bell finished ninth in the same poll. Wayne Gretzky finished 10th.Cherry — if you’ve never seen him — has a populist sensibility that seems to appeal to the same part of the Canadian psyche as Toronto’s crack-smoking mayor, Rob Ford.1Cherry was a special guest at Ford’s swearing-in ceremony as mayor in 2010. And like Ford, he isn’t much of a stickler for the rules. He loves physical hockey and hates ticky-tack penalties, like the one the Bruins got in Montreal 35 years ago.But Cherry’s experience in 1979, as much as it altered the course of Canadian and Canadien history, was more the exception than the rule. Usually in Game 7s, referees let an awful lot go and call far fewer penalties than they do in the regular season or the rest of the playoffs. Game 7s are very good environments for the physical hockey teams that Cherry likes best.Case in point: the 2010-11 Bruins, who won Boston its first Stanley Cup since 1972. In those playoffs, the Bruins became the first-ever NHL team to win three Game 7s. The Bruins were a penalty-prone team, finishing third in the league in major penalties and eighth in penalties overall. They benefited from referees swallowing their whistles in those three Game 7s; just 18 penalty minutes were called in those games, including no penalties at all in the Bruins’ conference finals win against the Tampa Bay Lightning.While a game with no penalties at all is an outlier,2There were just three during the NHL’s 2013-14 regular season, out of 1,230 games. referees routinely call fewer penalties in Game 7s. Since the 1987-88 playoffs, teams have accumulated an average of 8.6 penalty minutes per 60 minutes of ice time in Game 7s.3This assumes an average of 63 minutes of ice time per game in the playoffs and 61 in the regular season; playoff games are slightly longer because overtimes can go on indefinitely. The figures do not include bench minors — like Cherry’s too-many-men call — as Hockey-Reference.com does not track them, but these represent a small fraction of all penalties. The rate in the other six games of each playoff series is almost twice as high: 16.5 penalty minutes. It’s also almost twice as high — 16.1 penalty minutes — during the regular season.It’s unlikely that this is a fluke. Game 7s, like the one the Bruins and the Canadiens will play Wednesday and the New York Rangers and Pittsburgh Penguins will play Tuesday night, are a special treat. But there have been more than 100 of them since 1988, making for a reasonably large sample. Furthermore, there is evidence from baseball, basketball and other sports that officials are prone to passivity with more on the line. About 20 percent of power plays result in goals, both in the regular season and in the playoffs.But it’s easy to blame the refs. Is it possible that the players — as opposed to the officials — are doing something differently in Game 7s?Not in a way that would explain the discrepancies in the data. The NHL now keeps track of body checks, or hits. In Game 7s since 2009, teams have averaged 28.7 hits per 60 minutes of ice time. That’s a tiny bit lower than the rate in the first six games of the playoffs, which is 30.2 hits per 60 minutes. But it’s much higher than in the regular season, when teams average 22.2 hits. The playoffs are considerably more physical, and Game 7s are typical of the playoffs.It is true that teams get into fewer fights during the playoffs. Since 1997-98, teams have been called for 0.8 minutes’ worth of major penalties per 60 minutes of ice time in the playoffs, as compared to 2.7 per 60 minutes in the regular season. Major penalties generally mean fighting majors, so that can be taken to mean that fights are only about one-third as common in the playoffs. Perhaps there are fewer fights in Game 7 than during the rest of the playoffs — I don’t have that data handy. But fighting majors are so rare in the playoffs to begin with that they can’t account for much of the drop-off in penalty minutes in Game 7s compared to the rest of the series.Incidentally, there are more misconduct penalties called in the playoffs than during the regular season, and this trend has been especially pronounced during the past five years or so. For those of you who aren’t familiar with misconducts, they’re penalties that rule a player off the ice for either 10 minutes or the rest of the game, depending on the severity of the infraction. However, unlike major and minor penalties, they don’t give the other team a power play (although misconducts are usually called in conjunction with major or minor penalties). Thus misconducts, along with fines and suspensions from the league office, may serve as an attractive solution for officials. They serve a deterrent effect without having quite as much of a direct impact on the game as fans see it.But by Game 7, referees drop all pretense of calling the game as they usually would, despite the action remaining highly physical.Which teams might benefit from this? The next chart lists the net number of goals scored by each remaining playoff team during special-teams situations (power plays and penalty-kills; the totals include short-handed goals). The higher a team ranks on this list, the more it stands to lose from a drop-off in penalty calls. Conversely, the teams low on the list would prefer more even-strength play.The Penguins and the Rangers ranked first and third among NHL teams for net special-teams goals during the regular season. The Rangers’ power play has been awful in the playoffs so far, but that’s probably just a function of a small sample size. Still, they probably won’t mind a game with fewer penalties, especially since the Penguins’ power play is so deadly. On the other hand, the Rangers are more of a finesse than a power hockey team, so it’s not likely that they’ll just be able to check Sidney Crosby into submission, even with laxer officiating.The Bruins and the Canadiens might also be something of a wash. The Bruins recorded 17 percent more hits than the Canadiens during the regular season — but the Canadiens had 20 percent more penalty minutes. And while the Bruins have the better power play, Montreal has the better penalty-kill.If there’s a team that could benefit from the Game 7 officiating style, it could be the Los Angeles Kings. The Kings led the league in hits during the regular season, and while they avoided fighting majors, they had the fourth-highest number of minor penalties in the league. They also have an anemic power play and just an average penalty-kill, which made them net-negative in special-teams goals during the regular season.Don Cherry is still an unabashed Bruins fan, but the Kings fit his style the best, avoiding blatant cheap shots but otherwise pushing the limits of legal play. If they beat the Anaheim Ducks tomorrow to advance to a Game 7, they might have better luck than Cherry did. In 1979, the Boston Bruins, facing the Montreal Canadiens in Game 7 of the Stanley Cup semifinals, had a one-goal lead with 2 minutes and 34 seconds to play in the third period. But then the Bruins were whistled for a bench minor during a sloppy shift change — too many men on the ice. You can probably guess what happened next. Canadiens’ legend Guy Lafleur scored on the ensuing power play to tie the score. The Canadiens won in overtime. read more

These CavsWarriors Games Are Not Previews Of The NBA Finals

The Golden State Warriors beat the brakes off of the Cleveland Cavaliers on Monday in a 126-91 win. Basketball fans are fairly well trained not to extrapolate too much of the regular season to what will happen in the postseason, but with a walloping this thorough it’s natural to wonder if the Cavs have any chance in the Finals.But after two Warriors-Cavs games this season, we likely still haven’t seen what the teams will look like if they meet for the third Finals in a row this June.Basketball matchups aren’t really between teams, they’re between lineups. Fans are familiar with the famous five-man units, like the Warriors’ Death Lineup of Stephen Curry, Klay Thompson, Draymond Green, Andre Iguodala and Harrison Barnes, or the Megadeath Lineup, which swaps out Barnes for Kevin Durant. But the ramifications of more minor adjustments can be profound: In last season’s Finals, LeBron James, Kyrie Irving, Richard Jefferson, J.R. Smith and Tristan Thompson outscored opponents by 26.9 points per 100 possessions in 66 minutes; but when they swapped out Thompson for Iman Shumpert for 14 minutes, the Cavs were outscored by 16 points, or 56.6 points per 100 possessions.So lineups matter. And during the regular season, the Cavs’ and Warriors’ Finals lineups don’t play each other very much.The Cavs’ five most-favored lineups against the Warriors during the regular season have played a combined two minutes against them in the Finals. Two minutes! Obviously, injuries have been a factor: Kevin Love missed all the 2015 Finals, and Kyrie Irving was injured in Game 1 and did not play again in the series. But considering the most-played lineup against Golden State in 2016-17 includes DeAndre Liggins, and neither J.R. Smith nor Kyle Korver appears in a top-5 lineup, it’s a safe bet that we haven’t seen Cleveland’s preferred lineups against Golden State.The Warriors haven’t been much more consistent. In 2014-15, the five lineups that played most161 percent of available minutes. against the Cavs in the Warriors’ regular season games played 45 percent of available minutes in the Finals, anchored largely by the Death Lineup, which played 24 percent of the minutes (most of any lineup in that Finals) and outscored the Cavs by 21.8 points per 100 possessions.Last season, however, an injury to Bogut and a slump from Barnes threw the Warriors into disarray, as their five most favored lineups against the Cavs from the regular season played just 15 percent of available minutes in the Finals. Plus, the Death lineup didn’t play the Cavs enough during the regular season to crack the top five (and it was outscored by 12 per 100 possessions in 53 minutes anyway).All of which is to say that while the Warriors have reconstituted their roster since blowing a 3-1 lead to the Cavs in the Finals, it’s likely both teams will shuffle things again between now and June.Check out our latest NBA predictions. read more

Football You let it hurt for a while Ohio State looking for

OSU sophomore offensive lineman Isaiah Prince (59) fights back tears after the Buckeyes 24-21 loss to Penn State on Oct. 22. Credit: Alexa Mavrogianis | Photo EditorAlthough the Ohio State football team has sustained losses to unranked opponents in previous years, the 24-21 loss on Saturday to the Penn State Nittany Lions is a tough one to take for fans. For players like freshman starting guard Michael Jordan and freshman defensive end Nick Bosa, the defeat is their first in their collegiate careers, but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing.Going through a tough loss early in a career can be a motivation for improving upon the mistakes. Presenting a young team against Virginia Tech in 2014, OSU suffered a potentially season-ruining loss to the Hokies.After starting the year 1-1, the Buckeyes responded with 13-straight wins by an average margin of victory of just over 26 points. A youthful team responded to adversity with open arms, allowing themselves to grow from the loss to a team deemed subpar to OSU.OSU coach Urban Meyer said on Monday that the loss is not season ending, and needs to be a lesson for the young members of the team.“Move forward,” he said. “Let it hurt for awhile.”The feeling of losing is new to more than one of the team members, but slip ups from the unit were expected. The fact the Buckeyes are still within the top 10, and have the chance to still make the playoffs with a team full of young players serves as a beacon of hope. Both veterans and underclassmen were visibly upset as they left the field. Sophomore right tackle Isaiah Prince was fighting back tears while walking off, along with redshirt senior center Pat Elflein, who spoke to the media with a heavy voice. A fifth-year player, Elflein has been through all five of Meyer’s loses while at OSU. Even though the loss stings, he said it is something the young members of the team need to experience and use to keep playoff hopes alive.“Something you don’t want to feel, but you got to remember that feeling,” Elflein said. “That’s what has got to power you through, that feeling right there. You never want to feel that again.”Unlike the team’s only loss of 2015, the Buckeyes dropped their first game of the year at the midway point. With time still left on the clock, OSU can easily regroup and get back on the right path.The youth of the team might have caused OSU problems, but can also help the team down the road. The team understood there would be growing pains, and there would be times the young players would need to step up when faced with a challenge. Against Oklahoma, most fans felt the team had it’s largest moment of growth. In retrospect, the loss to Penn State should serve as a coming of age moment for the Buckeyes.Redshirt junior guard Billy Price, who played against Penn State in 2014 in Beaver Stadium, said he understood the feelings the young players were going through. However, he said the youth of the team is not the problem.“We are young, we are young. There are a lot of young guys in there. They’re playing well,” Price said. “They have to play for us and they have to execute. If we don’t execute that’s where we have issues like this.”Rather than singling out the poor play of specific players, Price said the loss was on the team as a whole, and its inability to execute the gameplan to perfection. He, like other Buckeyes, said this is a growing moment.Like in 2014, the team will be attempting to regroup from a loss at the hands of a non-ranked opponent. But, the loss was expected in some regards, due to the young nature of the team. Just like two years ago when the team went on a rampage after losing, OSU will have to prove the legitimacy of the team by winning games in convincing fashion. And, just like the national championship season, young players and new starters will have to give it their all.And giving it all was a sentiment redshirt junior quarterback J.T. Barrett expressed explicitly on Monday. “We’re gonna find out what we’re made of,” he said. “I think that’s how you really see people. Anybody can be doing fine when we’re winning games, but when your back is against the wall, things are going against us, that shows your true character and true colors.” read more

Bucks look to regroup for secondhalf run

Following a less-than-stellar first half of the season, the men’s hockey team is looking to improve in the second half, starting with two games against Bowling Green. The Buckeyes were just 7-12-1 through their first 20 games this season and are ninth in the Central Collegiate Hockey Association.But with 14 games remaining, all of them in-conference, the Buckeyes believe they can gain ground in the CCHA. “We’re feeling good about where we could be if we put things together and our guys are excited about that,” coach John Markell said.The Buckeyes haven’t played a game since Dec. 12, but resumed practice Dec. 28 and have used the time to improve on their power play and penalty kill. “We videoed our [penalty kill] everyday and our power play every day. We know how important that is,” Markell said. “The power play obviously needs to click for us.”The Buckeyes found themselves in the penalty box often in their first 20 games, which Markell acknowledged as another area of concern. “We can’t be caught in the penalty box a lot; that puts stress on too many things. Every little thing is magnified.” Improvement on the special teams — the power play and penalty kill — could reciprocate on the scoreboard and in the standings.Forwards Sergio Somma and Zac Dalpe noticed an increased intensity in practice since the team has come back. “In practice there were a couple scuffles on the ice and that’s good to see. Guys are working hard,” Somma said. “It says the intensity is there in practice. A high level of energy and intensity. Obviously that spawns winning and that spawns good teams.”Somma and the rest of the Buckeyes will put that intensity to the test against in-state rival Bowling Green this weekend. The teams have a bit of familiarity with each other from playing in the CCHA and having met in the postseason last year. Bowling Green comes into the weekend struggling (3-15-2), but no one at Ohio State is taking them lightly, especially coach Markell.“We know Bowling Green is a very hard-working team,” Markell said. “It’s going to take everything we can muster up to beat them. You have to be at a competitive level each and every night or it will sting you. You don’t get by with taking any short cuts in college hockey.”There is some concern whether OSU will be able to be at that competitive level after their recent hiatus from play. “Realistically we haven’t played a game in a month. There is going to be a little rust there,” Markell said. “Bowling Green is going to have two games under their belt.” The Falcons played two games last weekend and look to be sharp coming into Columbus.However, Somma is confident the team will be ready. “We’ve been conditioning a lot, but at the same time there is nothing like actually playing a game, so I’m sure it will take a good half period to get your legs back and get to game speed,” he said. “But we’re not out of shape by any means.”OSU will need to get back to game speed quickly if they’re going to beat Bowling Green this weekend. The games are Friday and Saturday at 7:05 p.m. at the Schottenstein Center. read more

Liverpool goalkeeper Alisson admits he cant understand the Scouse accent

first_imgLiverpool goalkeeper Alisson Becker says he is finding it difficult to understand some of his team-mates who have different accents.The Brazilian says he struggles to understand teammate Trent Alexander-Arnold and also has to contend with Mackem Henderson, Glaswegian Robertson and Yorkshireman Milner.The shot-stopper who arrived Anfield from Roma last summer says he finds it easier to understand his foreign team-mates when they speak English than the native Brits.Allison says it is very difficult for him to understand Brummie and Yorkshire accents and also the scouse twang of Trent Alexander-Arnold and some other  training staffAlisson told the Daily Star via The Mirror: Jadon Sancho, Borussia DortmundCrouch: Liverpool could beat Man United to Jadon Sancho Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Peter Crouch wouldn’t be surprised to see Jadon Sancho end up at Liverpool one day instead of his long-term pursuers Manchester United.“The British accent is hard for me to understand. In Brazil, we’re used to hearing American-English.“It’s been easier to understand my non-English teammates speaking English than the local ones.“Hopefully, I can improve my vocabulary.”Alisson has had a brilliant season so far.last_img read more

San Diego residents play in snow before next storm

first_img February 19, 2019 00:00 00:00 spaceplay / pause qunload | stop ffullscreenshift + ←→slower / faster ↑↓volume mmute ←→seek  . seek to previous 12… 6 seek to 10%, 20% … 60% XColor SettingsAaAaAaAaTextBackgroundOpacity SettingsTextOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundSemi-TransparentOpaqueTransparentFont SettingsSize||TypeSerif MonospaceSerifSans Serif MonospaceSans SerifCasualCursiveSmallCapsResetSave SettingsSAN DIEGO (KUSI) – Last weekend’s snowstorm brought over four inches of snow to San Diego.Residents took advantage of today’s sunshine to have some fun in the snow, before another storm is expected to hit this week. Dan Plante Posted: February 19, 2019 Dan Plante, San Diego residents play in snow before next storm Categories: Local San Diego News FacebookTwitterlast_img read more

Some 280634 people now homeless Minister

first_imgparliamentThe number of homeless people in the country is now 280,634 while that of landless 1.07, land minister Shamsur Rahman Sherif told parliament on Tuesday, reports UNB.”Now the number of landless people is 1.06 million while that of homeless is 280,634 in the country,” he said.The minister was responding to an unstarred (written) question from Awami League MP Nizam Uddin Hazari (Feni-2).The minister said the total Khas land in the country is now 4.12 million acres. Of the Khas land, some 2.05 million acres are arable one and 2.07 million acres non-arable one, he added.Khas lands are allocated among landless poor people as they are rehabilitated through setting up of cluster villages and housing projects, he said.Sherif said the government has a target to allocate Khas lands among 50,000 landless families in the current fiscal year.Besides, Khas lands are allocated among 48 landless families in every upazila as per the Agricultural Khas Land Management and Settlement Policy 1997, the minister told the House.last_img read more

Why Prairie View AM Students Are Suing Waller County over Alleged Voter

first_img X To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code: Listen Sharecenter_img Abner Fletcher/Houston Public MediaEarly voting for the 2018 midterm elections began on October 22 in Texas. 00:00 /05:57 Students at Prairie View A&M University have filed a federal lawsuit alleging Waller County is suppressing the voting rights of its black residents.“The plaintiffs at Prairie View A&M, which is a predominately black school, are alleging that the county is not providing the same access to early voting on campus as it is in other parts of the county which are predominately white,” Teddy Rave, George Butler Research Professor at the University of Houston Law Center, told Houston Matters.The NAACP Legal Defense and Educational Fund filed the lawsuit in Houston on Monday on behalf of a group of five students. The lawsuit argues the county is violating the Voting Rights Act and the U.S. Constitution by not providing early voting locations on campus or in the city of Prairie View during the first week of early voting, which began on Monday. “Since at least the early 1970s, Waller County has consistently tried to limit the political power of Black voters in the City of Prairie View and at Prairie View A&M specifically by undermining their right to vote,” LDF Deputy Director of Litigation, Leah Aden, said in a statement. During the second week of early voting, Waller County will have polls open Monday through Friday in Prairie View at two different locations. But one of the locations is off-campus and not easily accessible to students, according to the lawsuit.Rave told Houston Matters that for this particular case the strongest claim is the violation of the Voting Rights Act. “They don’t have to actually show that the county is intentionally singling them out because of their race just that this has a discriminatory effect,” he said.When Houston Matters contacted Waller County District Attorney Elton Mathis’s office, they directed us to a statement on their Facebook page from yesterday:Given that early voting ends on November 2 there is also an urgency to the case. “The plaintiffs want a court order to provide more opportunities for early voting on the Prairie View A&M campus starting this Thursday,” Rave said. “They want the court to move very quickly.”The lawsuit follows concerns from earlier this month when students living on campus were told they needed to update their addresses before being able to vote in the midterms. But election officials said they didn’t reject any student registrations, and that the addresses could be changed on Election Day or beforehand.last_img read more

adidas Honors Black History Month with NCAA Partner Uniforms Inspired by the

first_img PORTLAND, ORE. – In celebration of Black History Month, the University of Louisville men’s basketball team will wear special adidas uniforms inspired by the creativity, passion and expression of the early 20th century’s Harlem Renaissance at the Cardinals’ Feb. 23 game against Virginia in the KFC Yum! Center.  UofL’s women’s team will wear the special uniforms for its home game against Boston College the following day on Feb. 24.Throughout the month of February, all adidas Power 5 conference NCAA men’s and women’s basketball teams will wear a head-to-toe uniform inspired by the ballrooms of that era, including Arizona State, Rutgers, North Carolina State, Miami, Mississippi State, Louisville, Kansas, Indiana, Nebraska, Texas A&M, and Georgia Tech. Considered one of the most influential movements in African American history, the Harlem Renaissance was a creative movement that kindled a new cultural identity. In this era, the Renaissance ballroom became a place that epitomized basketball culture as local teams perfected their game on the same wooden floors that were also used for ballroom dance events and jazz shows. Together, the Harlem community infused their spirit of dance & sport within their day to day lives, and created an indisputable marriage between music, culture, and the game.  Inspired by the wooden floors of the ballrooms where basketball became culture, each adidas team jersey also includes patterns which mimic the fabrics and prints of the 1920s that became a means of self-expression and community pride. Each uniform features a unique bean stitch texture around the team name, the word “BALLROOM” on the inner waistband of each short, and a “Celebrating Black Culture” patch. The collection also includes a series corresponding footwear silhouettes which echo the colors of the jazz ballrooms so important to the era. Each detail is meant to be an homage to the art, poetry, sounds and sport of the Renaissance, and to those driving their passion forward.”At adidas, we created the Celebrating Black Culture program as a way of honoring our past throughout Black History Month, but also across the entire calendar year,” said Adam Laitsas, Senior Director for adidas Basketball in North America. “We firmly believe that through sport, we have the power to change lives, and we’re humbled to be able to celebrate these historical sport moments through the new Harlem Renaissance collection, and can’t wait to see each team wear these on-court.”Both men’s and women’s basketball teams from each partner school will rock their unique jerseys in-game  throughout the month of February, and the full uniforms from a select group of universities are currently on sale on adidas.com.  The Red Louisville Cardinals Harlem Renaissance Swingman jersey and shorts are available through the GoCards.com store at this link:  https://uofl.me/2GvFll3 .For more information, visit adidas.com/basketball and follow the conversation @adidashoops on Twitter and Instagram.Print Friendly Version Story Linkslast_img read more