Watch Vision Of Gold in Race 2

first_imgThe second Super-6 offers a$1.1 million carryover at Caymanas Park tomorrow, while the Pick-9 commences at the guaranteed minimum of $1 million.The Pick-9 will be conducted from race two to 10, the first Super-6 from race one to six, the late Super-6 from race five to 10.We look at the first Super-6 which commences with a maiden 4-y-o and up condition race over a mile to be contested by eight starters, including the likely favourite MINY LEE, who caught the eye when a close second to I HAVE A DREAM over 1400 metres on Boxing Day.Prior to that, he was a close third to MR ROMANTIC and subsequent winner ABOGADO, and with trainer Donovan Plummer churning out the winners in recent weeks, MINY LEE with apprentice Jerome Innis gets the nod over DEMOLITION BOY and LAZZA.VISION OF GOLD, who has shown promise in his two starts to date, will now prove hard to beat in the second race over 1300 metres for native-bred three-year-olds, with former champion Omar Walker aboard.From the stables of 15-time champion trainer Wayne DaCosta, the chestnut colt by Fearless Vision out of the 1999 derby winner Good Prospect has been fitted with the visor and tongue tie following his good third to STUNNER over 1400 metres two months ago and having looked improved at exercise, gets the nod over stable-companion PERFECT ASSET (Lasix administered) and OK DUDE in an 11-strong field.TROJAN, who has been knocking at the door, tries a longer distance (1820 metres) in the third race for four-year-olds and up, and this could be just what the doctor ordered, despite the presence of KING WITHIN and COLOURS OF WAR in a seven-horse field. Top apprentice Linton Steadman has the leg over TROJAN, who carries 53.0kg by virtue of his 3.0kg apprentice claim.Ultra-consistent EUSEBIA, who finished a close third to PRINCESS SHEMIKA and INFANTRY OFFICER over 1200 metres recently, gets the nod over old rival SIR D and GRANDE MARQUE in the fourth race for $180,000 claimers over the straight, with Richie Mitchell now taking the ride in a field of 11.BIRD CATCHER, who won decisively for jockey Wesley Henry and trainer Fitzroy Glispie recently in two-year-old company, faces a highly thought of debutante AWESOME DESTINY (a bay filly by Afleet Express – Seek, working well) in the fifth race over 1200 metres for three-year-olds and it should go down to the wire. Preference, however, is for BIRD CATCHER, who won in a good time over 1100 metres on December 13.Then close the first Super-6 with the speedy GLOBAL (Bebeto Harvey) in the sixth race over 1300 metres in which GOLDEN GLORY and CLASSY AVIATOR are twin dangers in a field of 15.FIRST SUPER-6 FANCIES(1) MINY LEE/DEMOLITION BOY(2) VISION OF GOLD/PERFECT ASSET(3) TROJAN/KING WITHIN(4) EUSEBIA/SIR D(5) BIRD CATCHER/AWESOME DESTINY(6) GLOBAL/GOLDEN GLORYlast_img read more

OpenStax developing textbooks that deliver personalized lessons

first_imgShare1David Ruth713-348-6327david@rice.eduJade Boyd713-348-6778jadeboyd@rice.eduOpenStax developing textbooks that deliver personalized lessons Rice University-based nonprofit to create books that optimize how each student learnsHOUSTON — (Aug. 5, 2014) — Rice University-based nonprofit OpenStax, which has already provided free textbooks to hundreds of thousands of college students, today announced a $9 million effort to develop free, digital textbooks capable of delivering personalized lessons to high school students.OpenStax officials said the pioneering K-12 education project, which is funded by a grant from the Laura and John Arnold Foundation (LJAF), will use the same kind of technology that Google, Amazon and Netflix rely upon to deliver personalized search, retail and entertainment choices.“The same sort of algorithms that might predict which songs or books you’ll like can be used to deliver a personalized experience to every child in a classroom,” said OpenStax Founder Richard Baraniuk, Rice’s Victor E. Cameron Professor of Engineering.Richard BaraniukOpenStax is best-known for its higher-education division, OpenStax College. The rapidly growing publisher uses philanthropic gifts to produce high-quality, peer-reviewed textbooks that are free online and low-cost in print. OpenStax College’s first seven books have already saved students more than $13 million.OpenStax’s latest project is unique in more than one respect. It marks the nonprofit’s first venture in the K-12 educational space as well as its first effort to enhance books technologically to improve education outcomes in addition to educational access.“We can improve outcomes in a number of ways,” Baraniuk said. “We can help teachers and administrators by tapping into metrics that they already collect — like which kind of homework and test questions a student tends to get correct or incorrect — as well as things that only the book would notice — like which examples a student clicks on, how long she stays on a particular illustration or which sections she goes back to reread.”Rice University-based publisher OpenStax is embarking on a $9 million effort to develop free, digital textbooks capable of delivering personalized lessons to high school students.Baraniuk said the technology will pinpoint areas where students need more assistance, and it will react by delivering specific content to reinforce concepts in those areas. The personalized books will deliver tailored lessons that allow individual students to learn at their own pace. For fast learners, lessons might be streamlined and compact; for a struggling student, lessons might include supplemental material and additional learning exercises.“The technology is already here, in the sense that most of us use it online every day,” said Daniel Williamson, OpenStax managing director. “However, the full potential of this technology has yet to be realized for education. The project will allow us to demonstrate that this technology is effective and can be used in the classroom to improve both students’ and teachers’ return on effort.”Daniel WilliamsonWilliamson and Baraniuk said the two-year project calls for OpenStax to create proof-of-concept, fully personalized textbooks for Advanced Placement biology and high school physics. Much of the educational content will be repurposed from two popular OpenStax College titles — Concepts of Biology and College Physics.“This dynamic technology has the potential to dramatically improve teaching and learning,” LJAF Director of Venture Development Kelli Rhee explained. “Teachers will have a powerful, new tool for customized instruction that will help students master subject material. Progress will be tracked in real time and can be monitored from any location, giving teachers, parents, administrators and students greater insight into academic performance.”OpenStax is a nonprofit initiative of Rice University and is made possible by the support of the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, LJAF, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the 20 Million Minds Foundation, the Maxfield Foundation, the Calvin K. Kazanjian Foundation and the Leon Lowenstein Foundation. For more information, visit http://openstaxcollege.org.-30-VIDEO is available at:http://youtu.be/g1NCL47P-Ug FacebookTwitterPrintEmailAddThis High-resolution IMAGES are available for download at:http://news.rice.edu/files/2014/07/0805_OSX-K12textbook-L-lg.jpgCAPTION: Rice University-based publisher OpenStax is embarking on a $9 million effort to develop free, digital textbooks capable of delivering personalized lessons to high school students.CREDIT: Jeff Fitlow/Rice Universityhttp://news.rice.edu/files/2014/07/0805_OSX-K12-rich-lg.jpgCAPTION: Richard BaraniukCREDIT: Jeff Fitlow/Rice Universityhttp://news.rice.edu/files/2014/08/0805_OSX-K12-daniel2-lg.jpgCAPTION: Daniel WilliamsonCREDIT: Jeff Fitlow/Rice Universitycenter_img Located on a 300-acre forested campus in Houston, Rice University is consistently ranked among the nation’s top 20 universities by U.S. News & World Report. Rice has highly respected schools of Architecture, Business, Continuing Studies, Engineering, Humanities, Music, Natural Sciences and Social Sciences and is home to the Baker Institute for Public Policy. With 3,920 undergraduates and 2,567 graduate students, Rice’s undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio is just over 6-to-1. Its residential college system builds close-knit communities and lifelong friendships, just one reason why Rice has been ranked No. 1 for best quality of life multiple times by the Princeton Review and No. 2 for “best value” among private universities by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance. To read “What they’re saying about Rice,” go here.last_img read more