Green Pond draw, Dinthill win

first_img Irwin 1 Green Pond 1 Maldon 0 St James 3 Knockalva 1 Frome 4 Lacovia 2 Maggotty 1 Munro 1 Newell 1 Cross Keys 1 Manchester 5 Belair 0 BB Coke 2 deCarteret 0 Mile Gully 1 Lennon 5 Thompson Town 0 Edwin Allen 3 Claude McKay 1 York Castle 0 Steer Town 0 Ocho Rios 0 Marcus Garvey 1 Brown’s Town 2 Aabuthnott Gallimore 1 Charlemont 2 Guy’s Hill 2 Dinthill 3 Bog Walk 1 Winston Jones 0 Denbigh 2 Porus High 0 Garvey Maceo 1 Foga Road 0 Glenmuir 3 Today’s games Robert Lightbourne vs Yallahs Paul Bogle vs St Thomas Tech Seaforth vs Morant Bay Kemps Hill vs Old Harbour Vere Tech. vs Tacius Golding Brimmervale vs St. Mary High St Mary Tech. vs Iona High Christiana vs May Day Alston vs Spalding Bellefield vs Holmwood Little London vs Grange Hill Maud McLeod vs Manning’s Godfrey Stewart vs Petersfield Herbert Morrison vs William Knibb Holland vs Spot Valley Muschett vs Cedric Titus Central vs Bustamante Fair Prospect vs Happy Grove Oracabessa vs Port Antonio Tacky High vs Horace Clarke High WESTERN BUREAU: A Heavy and persistent downpour made the Zone A ISSA-FLOW daCosta Cup football game between Irwin High and Green Pond at Irwin a wretched experience, but in the end the 1-1 draw, according to the coaches, was a fair result. The rain had caused the field to be in puddles in certain sections by the scheduled kick-off time approached, and to make matters worse, it also accounted for the late arrival of the referee’s assistants. When they did arrive, the decision was taken to play two halves of 40 minutes each, as kick-off was already 40 minutes late. Forward Evardo Chambers missed two chances, but scored Green Pond’s all-important goal in the 37th minute. With their new coach, the experienced Anthony ‘Follies’ Williams, pulling the strings, Irwin went all out for the equaliser. It came with seconds left, following a mad scramble inside the six-yard box, which resulted in the ball rolling over the goal line and the referee signalling goal, with Green Pond’s goalkeeper, Kemar Ogle, left writhing in pain. He was eventually substituted and the game eventually ended in a 1-1 draw. “This is a work in progress for us,” stated Irwin’s coach Williams. “It was a spirited performance from the players and the wet conditions didn’t make it any better for us.” He added: “There is potential here and we are taking it match by match to see how far we can actually go. But I am all night with this draw, which could have been worse for us.” For Daley, however, it was two points lost. “We should have won the game hands down. We missed several chances to easily secure three points. But I will take this,” he said. Meanwhile, St James High joined Cornwall College at the top of Zone A with three points, after their 3-0 victory over Maldon, who are in last place in the zone. In Zone K, last year’s beaten finalists, Dinthill Technical, began their campaign with a 3-1 win over Bog Walk. Yesterday’s resultslast_img read more

Innocence Killed

first_imghe turned out to be one of the main volunteers who helped look for them. The incident is mostly forgotten now – only seven references to the murders turn up on an Internet search – but Theresa Pinamonli Zeigler remembers it like it was yesterday. “When something like that happens, it sticks in your brain,” said Zeigler, who was 7 at the time. “I’m 77, and I never forgot.” Zeigler went to school with the girls and had spent many afternoons playing with them. She recalls a seemingly simpler time, a time when kids turned their neighborhoods into giant playgrounds. She saw the girls the day they disappeared. “I saw them in the park,” Zeigler said. “We were all frequent visitors to the park.” After the deaths, the quaint lifestyle came to an end. “It was scary,” Zeigler said. “When you’re 7, you don’t realize what’s going on. But I remember the grown-ups standing around in the street when they found the bodies. I remember how shocked they were.” Dyer was one of those people standing in the street. Described by those who knew him as “simpleminded,” “a nut, but good-hearted” and “goofy but harmless,” Dryer told the crowd not to smoke “out of respect for the dead.” That day, his wife helped him clip newspaper stories about the incident for a scrapbook he had begun. He couldn’t help but draw attention to himself. Although he was questioned by police, investigators didn’t consider him a suspect at first. But a few days after the discovery, he appeared at the Inglewood police station and announced, “I hear you are looking for me.” He was told that nobody had even mentioned him and he left police headquarters “somewhat crestfallen,” according to a 1937 Daily Breeze article. His strange behavior alerted authorities, who immediately began to follow him. Then, a woman – “her name was withheld for obvious reasons,” the article states – recognized the killer’s description and identified Dyer to police in Hermosa. It turned out the Dyer had more than one run-in with South Bay law enforcement. In 1926, he was arrested twice in Redondo Beach for reasons unknown. And, in 1931, after a tryst with a Manhattan Beach woman, he was picked up. He quickly confessed to the murders, telling police the girls “looked fresh and nice.” He explained to authorities that he took the girls to a bean field and lured them off one at a time to help him catch a rabbit. First was the youngest victim, Madeline. He strangled her and tied a rope around her neck just to be sure. Next was Jeanette, who was also lured into the brush and killed. Melba, the final victim, played by herself while waiting for his return, Dyer explained. After he killed them, he “violated their lifeless bodies,” according to a Daily Breeze article. Dyer went home, changed his clothes and “ate a good supper,” before returning to the neighborhood to see if anybody was looking for the girls. Other kids came forward and told police that Dyer had tried to lure them to the park. But the father of the two sisters was suspicious of the confession. Merle O. Everett said his daughters could not possibly have walked 5 miles to the murder scene. “Some men will confess anything under pressure, you know, especially if they’re a little weak-minded.” A surviving sister identified another man as offering to take them rabbit hunting a year earlier. Others blamed drugs for the atrocity. “Some of the brutal and unspeakable sex crimes of recent years have had their cause in marihuana,” according to On the Trail of Marihuana the Weed of Madness, a 1939 book by Earle Rowell. No matter. Dyer was quickly convicted of the crime and on Sept. 15, 1938, was hanged in San Quentin. josh.grossberg@dailybreeze.com160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! By Josh Grossberg STAFF WRITER It was shocking, even by today’s standards: On a Saturday morning 70 years ago, three little girls vanished from Centinela Park near their homes in Inglewood. They didn’t show up for supper and, by the next day, friends, police and an army of volunteers scoured the neighborhood. A statewide alarm was sent out. But two days later, their families’ worst fears were realized. On Monday, June 26, 1937, a group of Boy Scouts found the lifeless bodies of 7-year-old Madeline Everett, 9-year-old sister Melba and a playmate, 8-year-old Jeanette Stephens. They were discovered in a deep gully in a remote section of Baldwin Hills. Within days, with the help of a tip given to Hermosa Beach police, a Redondo Beach man was arrested. Not only did 32-year-old Albert Dyer know the girls – he was a crossing guard at their school – but last_img read more