Six Nations: Five things England learnt against Italy

first_img TAGS: Highlight LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Holding court: Billy Vunipola gets to grips with Luke McLean As Italy gather Ben Youngs’ excellent box-kick, they have slow ball. That means England can launch at them with rapid line-speed:Burrell, Tom Youngs and Tom Croft win the ruck as the ball is dropped and Cipriani, who had been covering the kick, can ht the line at pace from depth. His arc and intent holds the Italian fringe defence and frees up a two-on-two:Twelvetrees ships onto Jonny May quickly, giving the Gloucester man a chance to back his speed, cutting back in and freeing an arm to find Cipriani’s clever, pre-emptive support line:Twelvetrees brings backline togetherBrown’s sickening head knock required a patch-up assignment from Stuart Lancaster, which was solved by shifting Anthony Watson to full back, Jonathan Joseph onto the right wing and introducing Twelvetrees at inside centre.As he had been at the Millennium Stadium, the 26 year-old was very good, offering a kicking option and a second distribution outlet that really helped England’s fluidity. In the first half, this gorgeous floated pass to May should have brought a try:Slotting in behind Ford, he bypasses Luke McLean to put his Kingsholm clubmate in acres of room:Later on, Ford and Twelvetrees switched roles to conduct a wonderful strike move for Joseph’s second:Runners in motion is the foundation here, and the move presented Lancaster with a fascinating conundrum – should this combination have more time together? It is worth tracking the whole thing, from where they set up at the scrum……to their running lines as Twelvetrees takes the ball flat and fires back to Ford……to how Ford manipulates the defence before fixing Masi and slipping Joseph in as Morisi drifts off to cover Watson:Chopping and changing positions and personnel is difficult, especially during a Test match. Twelvetrees’ skills an communication eased the transition hugely.Dealing with disruptionItaly‘s abrasive, full-blooded style has always required composure and persistence to break down. Over the 80 minutes, England built towards achieving that. It was a process, and examining two separate mauls can show us how Graham Rowntree‘s pack problem solved.First, one on the stroke of half-time that was splintered and turned over:Iconic Italian forwards Parisse and Martin Castrogiovanni plough through to seize the ball and hold it up:Now watch how effectively England employ the same tactic to carry Nick Easter over the line:Forming a barrier to halt any Azzurri spoilers, George Kruis and Croft are integral:Then, the power of Tom Youngs and Billy Vunipola takes hold as England rumble towards the whitewash: England may have felt irritated at the final whistle on Saturday, but a 47-17 win over Italy brought plenty of reasons for optimism. We analyse the performance. Rewind two years. England have just clung on to beat Italy 18-11, surviving a late bombardment of their try-line thanks in no small part to Chris Robshaw’s superhuman defensive effort. Afterwards, the talk is of relief, delight, a fourth consecutive Six Nations win and a Grand Slam shot in Cardiff.Yesterday, the Azzurri suffered a 47-17 defeat. A few uncertain moments scattered England’s display, but the overall tone of the afternoon was authoritative. Even so, despite six tries and some fine attacking, each player felt palpable frustration at the final whistle.Besides anything else, that is a pretty good gauge of progress. Here are five facets England can take away from the game.Sluggish start and spacingStatistics often fail to paint a fair picture. One number from the weekend will burn England defence coach Andy Farrell, though. His charges conceded eight line-breaks. That is one every the same figure an all-star Australian outfit managed back in November.The bad habits began early, with Luca Morisi finding space from a stolen lineout within five minutes:This is about an uncharacteristic lack of industry on second phase. After losing the set-piece, England are simply beaten around the corner.The hosts stack up in midfield expecting their opponents to bounce back right, and are outnumbered. Anthony Watson is outflanked and only a combination of Mike Brown and Dave Attwood scramble to save the try:Sergio Parisse did cross the line soon after this error, and another mistake was punished by Morisi for a try just after the break:Organisation and spacing are the issue here. From the reverse angle, we can see how vulnerable the link between Attwood and Joe Marler is:While Italy are on the front foot thanks to Leonard Sarto‘s chip-and-gather, this is still a significant lapse. Staying tighter would force protect Marler’s lack of pace Italy to put the ball through the hands – far from a foregone conclusion. As it happens, Morisi can simply feign a pass and slide through:Ireland will obliterate such confusion on March 1. It must be ironed out.Back-row blendNow for the positives. Tom Wood is expected to have recovered from his ankle injury by the end of the month. Unfortunately for him, England’s loose forward trio of Robshaw, James Haskell and Billy Vunipola is functioning very well.They made a combined total of 46 tackles against Italy, missing just three, and were involved in some pivotal plays too – some of which we will touch on later.For now, watch this rescue act from Haskell, who hares down Samuela Vunisa to nab a crucial turnover:This demonstrates both athleticism – Haskell bouncing to his feet rapidly – and intelligence, to swoop on the ball when he realises no ruck is formed.Robshaw and Vunipola worked together for a similar effort later:Rushing out to down Andrea Masi, Robshaw makes Italy pay for playing too much rugby in their own territory. Dan Cole latches on with Vunipola supporting – and therefore galvanising his prop’s position:Turnovers into tries Ben Smith‘s game-changing try in Dunedin last June was a lesson in smash-and-grab attack that shifted momentum from England to New Zealand in a flash. Snatching possession, the All Blacks went 70 metres in six passes and 15 seconds.For a couple of scores on Saturday, England were as clinical. Here, Jonathan Joseph‘s first:Obviously, the initial step is the turnover itself, which is once more a brilliantly-executed collective effort. Luther Burrell, who had an outstanding match under the radar, and Billy Twelvetrees hold up Morisi before the heavies – in the form of Robshaw and Vunipola – arrive.Robshaw wrestles the ball to deck and places back for Ben Youngs:Cole and Burrell shift it onto George Ford, who can look up to see a backline in disarray:The rest is all about Joseph, and the reverse angle illustrates how he carries in two hands to create indecision in Giovanbattista Venditti:Danny Cipriani‘s crowd-pleaser was the next try to come from a forced error: This surge brought England’s final points as Italy ended the game with a strong 12-minute spell. Perhaps that was a big reason for the general irritation among the squad. Now the emotion has subsided, they can look back and be generally happy.That said, better is needed in Dublin. In two weeks, we will really learn the measure of this England side.last_img read more

World Cup squads selections continue to raise eyebrows

first_imgLATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS With the players now ensconced in their 31-man squads, many continue to question how coaches have come to certain conclusions, not least England By Will MacphersonMaking sense of World Cup squads is an exercise carried out on two levels. Firstly, things are best kept simple: who’s in, who’s out, which coach nailed it and who’s made an utter horlicks of things. Thirty-one, while one more than coaches have been allowed at recent World Cups, really isn’t very many, especially for the talent-rich powerhouses whose squads garner the most interest. A good coach and a good selector are two utterly different things, remember.Then there’s the why, the search for trends and patterns, which positions are in fashion, which ones actually matter most? Where can gambles be taken, and where do the hatches need to be truly battened down? Can a “bolter” truly be a bolter when there’s two other “bolters” in the squad? Do you really need three scrum-halves? Choose a random number between three and five as to how many locks you need. Two? You’re going with just two hookers?Grunt: Jim Hamilton has announced his retirement after being overlooked by Scotland for the Rugby World CupThere are, without doubt, some peculiar, lefter than leftfield choices – I’m looking at you, John Hardie – but most fans seem to worry more about who misses out, rather than who makes it in. Sticking with that Scottish theme, it seems unfathomable that both Blair Cowan – perhaps their finest loosie in recent times – and John Barclay can be left out. It’s equally difficult to imagine that 30 minutes of Jim Hamilton brimstone and fire wouldn’t have been welcome at some stage in place of the go-forward and energy of a Gray brother.Likewise England. It’s those left behind that seem to rankle. At least all us fans of all things silky – ie Danny Cipriani (Cipporters, anyone?) – had the news broken to us a day early. And indeed that was a decision that made a bit of sense, even if the tournament is that much less exciting without him. Shortly after, the internet had kindly conjured up a meme showing the shape of an XV Lancaster was able to do without, and of course it looked great. Changing faces: The England squad make-up has changed massively in only 14 months center_img Unlucky cut: Charles Piutau can feel aggrieved to have missed out on the All Blacks squadNew Zealand, of course, are the opposite. Since that tour last year they’ve simply streamlined themselves, ditching class acts in favour of class acts in better form, with Charles Piutau the only player genuinely unlucky to miss out, not so Cory Jane and Israel Dagg. The pack is the same, but the finishers tweaked; they look as fearsome as ever.Finally, to Wales. Warren Gatland’s plumping on two hookers is bold, but it’s hard to argue he’s nailed the PR battle. He did his big omissions weeks before the deadline, he’s given himself vital cover for his most important player (AWJ) and his surprise pick – if you can call Matthew Morgan that – is the sort of romantic player that Welshmen want to be and Welsh women want to be with. Of course, this is just the phoney war, but Gatland has risen to the occasion again. With England, it’s hard not to wonder how it came to this. Dylan Hartley and Manu Tuilagi were authors of their own destiny, of course, and France-based folk all but forced Lancaster’s hand, but not entirely. But how did England end up with a situation where the four centres go into the tournament with fewer than 40 caps between them, and as many players in the squad will arrive with two caps or less as 50 or more (three each). All the “culture” in the world can’t substitute experience, and which ever way you spin it – and whichever colour they play in – England look green.Missing in action: Manu Tuilagi will be a big miss for England this World CupThe thing that’s struck me most about this England squad and the sheer uncertainty around it, is how heartily I would have scoffed had you handed it to me on a piece of paper a year ago. Somehow, somewhere along the line, for various reasons, seven England men chosen for the Lions in 2013 haven’t ended up making the World Cup squad. That tour of New Zealand – that catalogue of near misses – was billed at the time as a near-final chance to impress.Instead, the squad has a rather different look to it. Of the seven players who started in the three-quarters in the three Tests on that tour, only Jonny May (who played 79 of 240 minutes) has made the World Cup squad. One-fifth of the eventual squad ended that tour uncapped. Seemingly established squad members have withered, on the field and off it. Dave Attwood, Billy Twelvetrees and even Luther Burrell had plenty of opportunities to nail their places, and didn’t. As classy as they all will end up being, there is, in truth, no need for any of George Kruis, Henry Slade or Sam Burgess to be in this squad. Lancaster invested time and caps in those others and they haven’t done enough.last_img read more

Who should coach the British & Irish Lions?

first_img TAGS: Highlight The British & Irish Lions’ tour to New Zealand is less than 12 months away but who will be coaching the team that have the job of trying to emulate Carwyn James’ greats of 1971? Now the summer tours are done, the names of potential British & Irish Lions coaching combinations are being flung around like confetti, so what could the management team for next year’s trip to New Zealand look like? The Lions are intending to name it at the end of the summer, but as that has barely started, they have a bit of wriggle room.Last time, in 2013 to Australia, the tour was managed by former Scotland full-back Andy Irvine with Warren Gatland the main man as head coach. Rob Howley was in charge of attack, Graham Rowntree the forwards, Andy Farrell defence and Neil Jenkins kicking. And a pretty good job they did.The tour manager is already in place and at least he knows how to win in New Zealand. Ex-England centre John Spencer, part of the 1971 Lions squad without playing a Test match, has already been installed in the logistical and ceremonial role but experience of winning down there is pretty thin on the ground elsewhere.Eddie Jones this week distanced himself from the role of head coach, yet again, and Gatland has already been made favourite to be head honcho by Lions’ chief executive John Feehan. In January Feehan also name-checked Stuart Lancaster, out-coached by Gatland in the World Cup, and linked with most coaching posts these days on both sides of the equator. But pundits have been throwing some more names into the ring.Lion’s roar: Martin Johnson (left) would bring a formidable presence to the tour. (Photo: Getty Images)Ben Kay, a Lion in 2005, wants a Joe Schmidt/Martin Johnson dream ticket; Keith Wood, a double Lion, wants Jones and Gatland, but that seems a non-runner; whilst Clive Rowlands, manager of the 1989 tour to Australia, has championed Dai Young and Gregor Townsend for some involvement.The appointment of the head coach is the key though – then he can pick the men he wants to pick the brains of, as Gatland did with Farrell, and blokes he gets on with or thinks he can. Or we can pick them for him, like we have done below.Head coachGatland has been given the green light by the Welsh Rugby Union to have time off on Lions duty ahead of and during the tour, he was an assistant in 2009 in South Africa and won the series in Australia in 2013. He has copped his fair share of flak since the Wales tour to New Zealand but he ticks all the boxes of seemingly wanting to do it, being experienced and definitely being available. The former Kiwi hooker would see his stock in his homeland go through the roof if he fashioned another win and it would probably give him a leg-up to the All Blacks job sometime.Marked man: Could Mark McCall, coach of the European champions, do the job? (Photo: Getty Images)Schmidt is a contender but his international contract does not have a release clause at the moment and his future with Ireland is uncertain because of family issues, whilst Vern Cotter is a long-shot after a disappointing Six Nations with Scotland. If the Lions went really left field they could go for a successful club boss who is not scared of big names – Connacht’s Pat Lam or Mark McCall from Saracens, anyone?Odds: Gatland 1/2, Schmidt 5/2, Jones 6/1, Cotter 14/1 I’ll drink to that: Warren Gatland toasts the 2013 Lions tour win. (Photo: Inpho) LATEST RUGBY WORLD MAGAZINE SUBSCRIPTION DEALS Dream teamWarren Gatland (head coach); Gregor Townsend (attack), Shaun Edwards (defence), Steve Borthwick and Dai Young (forwards), Jonny Wilkinson (kicking). Assistant coachesI wouldn’t mind seeing Johnson involved somewhere just for his presence, but he has been out of the game for too long to be an assistant, although he could be a sounding board for the head man. In attack Gregor Townsend, a winning Lion in 1997, deserves a crack. It takes something special to break down the All Blacks and Townsend could just supply it. He won the Pro12 with Glasgow in 2015 and if any player questions him he can show them the video of the ‘Toonie Flip’that set up a Gavin Hastings try in Scotland’s 23-21 win over France in Paris in 1995.Attacking option: Former Lions player Gregor Townsend fits the bill for 2017. (Photo: Getty Images)Howley still has claims, Schmidt could even do the job as a number two or Glen Ella, who went down a storm on England’s tour to Australia, might fancy a few weeks in New Zealand.Farrell, a veteran of 2013 when Gatland gave him the nod over Shaun Edwards, is back in the international game after England’s World Cup collapse, as defence coach of Ireland, and must still be rated to get a gig with the Lions. Edwards is a winner and has stated he wants another Lions tour and you can’t see him stuffing up if he gets the job.Paul Gustard did wonders with England’s defence in the Six Nations but Jones recently said England had conceded too many tries against Australia – they leaked ten in three Tests – despite the heroics in Melbourne, and I reckon Jones wouldn’t mind another tour with Gustard in Argentina with England’s non-Lions. It’s Edwards for me this time.Up-front, Steve Borthwick gets a ticket to New Zealand – imagine all the lineout videos he could study in nearly 30 hours in a business class seat. He shone with Japan at the World Cup, has done the same with England and I wouldn’t mind seeing Young helping out the forwards with him.Young knows a thing or two about Lions tours. The former Welsh prop is the only man to go on trips with Britain’s best in three separate decades – 1989, 1997 and 2001 – so he knows what it is all about, he loves a scrum and although some details, such as his Wasps duties, would have to be sorted – likewise with Townsend and Glasgow – he wouldn’t mind getting his hands dirty.Best man: Is there a more qualified kicking coach than Jonny Wilkinson? (Photo: Inpho)Jenkins had worked with Leigh Halfpenny, with Wales, ahead of his 2013 tour of duty and both did a great job but what about if Jonny Wilkinson was on the training paddock every day? Wilkinson has popped in and out of England camp since Jones arrived and done plenty of work with Owen Farrell and George Ford. TV commitments might restrict the English great but he doesn’t have to work on match days with the squad. Wilkinson does all his stuff in the week, the southern hemisphere are scared stiff of him and current players revere him. Get him signed up.last_img read more

Rapidísimas

first_img Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Collierville, TN Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Rector Washington, DC [Episcopal News Service] Una pareja de actores procedentes de Cuba, abandonaron su grupo en el aeropuerto de Miami cuando viajaban a Nueva York para participar en un festival de cine. Los actores Anaylín de la Rúa de la Torre y Javier Núñez Florián, cada uno tiene 20 años, son novios y filmaron la película titulada “Una noche” hace cuatro años bajo la dirección de la cineasta británica Lucy Mullay. En declaraciones a la prensa dijeron que en Estados Unidos “hay más oportunidades de trabajo y libertad”.La publicación en Alemania de un nueva versión de Mein Kampf (Mi lucha), el libro insignia de Adolfo Hitler en el que expuso su doctrina ultranacionalista y antisemita del nazismo, ha provocado controversias en algunos sectores de la comunidad judía que aún no olvidan los horrores del Holocausto. Hitler se suicidó en su búnker de Berlín el 30 de abril de 1945 junto con su amante Eva Braun.Madeleine Albright, profesora y ex secretaria de estado de Estados Unidos, acaba de publicar un libro titulado El invierno de Praga en el que habla de su infancia y la persecución nazi. También hace referencia a sus familiares judíos. Albright es miembro de la Iglesia Episcopal.La oficina de relaciones públicas de la diócesis episcopal del Sureste de la Florida informa que el obispo Leo Frade hará dos “peregrinajes” a Cuba este año. Uno será del 1 al 6 de agosto y el otro del 21 al 26 de noviembre. Los peregrinajes tienen por objeto acompañar mejor a la Iglesia Episcopal en Cuba que junto con las demás iglesias está experimentando “un avivamiento” espiritual y disfrutando de “mayores libertades”. Frade y su esposa Diana han visitado Cuba 10 veces en los últimos años, en varias ocasiones trayendo ex presos políticos. El costo del viaje es de $2,850. El grupo visitará Cárdenas, Santa Cruz del Norte, Matanzas y Bacuranao, además de La Habana. Griselda Delgado, nacida y criada en Bolivia, es la obispa de la Iglesia Episcopal de Cuba.Las relaciones con Cuba siguen siendo tema de discusión en los medios de Miami. La petición de los obispos católicos romanos de Estados Unidos pidiendo el establecimiento de relaciones diplomáticas con la isla, la eliminación de restricciones de viajes y el fin del embargo económico establecido en 1962, ha recibido severas críticas. El obispo Richard Pates dijo a nombre de sus colegas que con esas decisiones se “estará apoyando al pueblo de Cuba, nuestros vecinos apenas 144 kilómetros de distancia, a los derechos humanos y a la libertad religiosa”.La Iglesia Metodista Unida que se reunió la semana pasada en Tampa, Florida, en su Conferencia General, ha tomado un paso importante después de una década de discusiones. La conferencia ha decidido entrar en un acuerdo de plena comunión con cinco denominaciones negras que salieron de la Iglesia Metodista en el siglo XVIII por razones raciales. Hace 12 años la iglesia tuvo una ceremonia pidiendo “arrepentimiento y perdón” por la conducta racista que había tenido. El obispo Thomas Hoyt Jr. dijo que “ya era hora”.Charles Colson, conocido por haber sido asesor especial del presidente Richard Nixon y haber guardado prisión por su participación en el escándalo de Watergate, ha fallecido de una operación cerebral a la edad de 80 años en Lansdowne, Virginia. Las iglesias evangélicas lo recuerdan por su dramática conversión espiritual y la formación del ministerio carcelario que ayudó a evangelizar a miles de presos.Un reciente informe sobre la situación social de la mujer en Estados Unidos revela que aunque se le concedió el voto en 1920, aún existen “desigualdades injustas”. Por ejemplo, en la Cámara de Representantes sólo el 17 por ciento son mujeres y en la historia de Estados Unidos 277 mujeres han sido electas a la Cámara mientras que en el mismo período se han elegido a 12,000 hombres. Sólo el 3 por ciento de los presidentes de las grandes corporaciones son mujeres y éstas sólo ganan el 81 por ciento de lo que ganan los hombres.La cadena de televisión MSNBC dijo el jueves pasado que un prominente sacerdote católico romano australiano contrajo matrimonio secreto hace un año con una bella joven filipina llamada Josephine. Kevin Lee le explicó a su congregación de Sydney su decisión que fue recibida con aplausos y lágrimas. El obispo Anthony Fisher ha despojado a Lee de sus privilegios y responsabilidades sacerdotales. También negó las palabras del sacerdote que dijo que “muchos de mis compañeros están en la misma situación que la mía. El celibato tiene que abolirse”.VERDAD. “Debemos amarnos unos a otros, porque el amor viene de Dios”. I Juan 4:7 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Tampa, FL Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Belleville, IL Submit a Press Release Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Por Onell A. SotoPosted May 9, 2012 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Course Director Jerusalem, Israel center_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Youth Minister Lorton, VA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rapidísimas Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Press Release Service The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit a Job Listing Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MIlast_img read more

World Council of Churches to hold first meeting in China

first_imgWorld Council of Churches to hold first meeting in China Rector Hopkinsville, KY Elizabeth Hanson Mellen says: [Ecumenical News International] The Geneva-based World Council of Churches (WCC) said it will hold its first meeting in the People’s Republic of China, focusing on “the unique situation of Chinese churches and ecumenical relations” in the region.The meeting will take place from June 9-16 in Shanghai and Nanjing, according to a WCC news release. It is being organized by the WCC Commission of the Churches on International Affairs (CCIA) and hosted by the China Christian Council (CCC) and the National Committee of the Three Self Patriotic Movement of the Protestant Churches in China. The CCC, with 23 million members, is the largest member constituency of the WCC in Asia.The WCC general secretary, the Rev. Olav Fykse Tveit, will attend the meeting. It will be his first visit to China since he took office in 2010.The main deliberations of the CCIA will take place in Nanjing. This will include a seminar on “Understanding China,” invoking diverse perspectives on market reforms and development in socialist systems, poverty eradication and environmental sustainability, China’s religions and religious policies, and churches in China.“This is the 51st meeting of the CCIA. The meeting will be a historic event as it is the first time since the inception of the WCC [in 1948] that an international ecumenical gathering will take place in China, and will be hosted by a WCC member church in China,” said Mathews George Chunakara, director of the CCIA.The event will begin with meetings in Shanghai, with Sunday worship services in local Chinese congregations, followed by visits to urban and rural models of life in the context of modern China.The final meeting of the CCIA in follow up to the WCC 10th Assembly, which will take place in 2013 in Busan, South Korea, will discuss future program directions and significance of international affairs in the ecumenical movement. This will also include discussions on priorities for public policy and global advocacy initiatives in the emerging geo-political situation.The WCC brings together 349 Protestant, Orthodox, Anglican and other churches representing more than 560 million Christians in over 110 countries, and works cooperatively with the Roman Catholic Church. The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH May 30, 2012 at 5:29 pm Are papers or reports going to be available to us who are interested in doing ecumenical work in China? This is my discerned mission as a lay member of Trinity Church Wall Street in New York.I am working on a feasibility study for our parish and the Anglican Communion writ large to partner with NGO’s, their faith based NGO’s, in the newly receptive climate in China.My “DNA” is in China, my grandfather was a missionary there from 1895-1940. My father served on the Marshall Mission, and as Military attache in Beijing from 1946-1949. I received my MA in Chinese Studies from SOAS at University of London and in partnership with Sotheby’s Institute of Art, and hope to continue my work with a PhD. I met Jon Huntsman, Jr. last week, as part of a symposium on China, and heard his view as outgoing Ambassador. I am unable to travel to Nanjing, our Parish donated two antique Tiffany windows to the Anglican Cathedral, rebuilt sine 1860. I hope to contribute my knowledge of 5000 years of Chinese culture, and the problems that beset missionaries in the early part of the 20th century, to which I am connected. Please let me know. John McCann says: May 31, 2012 at 12:59 pm I am delighted to see a story from the World Council of Churches included in this ENS sending. I was in ecumenical work work (National Council of Churches and Graymoor Ecumenical & Interreligious Institute) for 12 years and have long been concerned about the dearth of news and lack of info spreading and education in our general church media about the participation of the Episcopal Church in the longstanding instruments for Christian unity — the National Council of Churches of Christ USA and the WCC — as well as the many local church and interreligious councils in the U.S. in which Episcopal presence and participation is a vital factor. Let’s hear more. Episcopal Church participation and leadership in the ecumenical movement is a big part of our history. In addition the work of the WCC is stellar — what an amazing presence in the world — of which this China initiative is a tremendous example. Tell us more!By coincidence my grandparents also (referencing the previous comment) were missionaries in China for 50 years 1903-1951. We have been to visit their place of ministry in Taian, Shandong Province and find a newly thriving church in the same lovely sanctuary and, at the heart of the huge multi building city high school complex , the beautiful school building built and funded through the efforts of my grandfather. And the memories still alive and honored, though the context so vastly altered — the church of course part of the 3-Self Protestant Church group, no longer Methodist. Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis John McCann says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem June 9, 2012 at 9:40 am The past two entries have resonance for me. I passed up a Pilgrimage on the Camino del Camposta de Santiago with a group from Trinity to be able to attend the conference, I am being sponsored but not by our church. Having seen the arc from the early 20h century like Elizabeth Mellon described, through the difficulties of the 20th century… this is a hopeful sign, and Trinity, which is one of the wealthiest churches in real estate (thanks to a grant from Queen Anne of farmland which is now lower Manhattan) was a fluke I my mission is to persuade Trinity to take on some work in China, and to start building some “guanxi”. There was the famous comment when Nixon asked Zhou En Lai what the ramifications of the French Revolution are, and ZHou said “its too early to tell.” Which illustrates one side of how the Chinese work. But this is an historic event and shouldn’t be missed. I am just going to the Nanjing part, not being sponsored by my church, but by some anonymous donors, who are affiliated with the National Commitee on US- CHina relations. Nanjing University was originally started by a Methodist missionary, Dr. John C.Fergeson, who was an historic collector of Chinese bronzes, which mow reside in the Nanjing University collection, rarely seen, Rector Knoxville, TN Submit a Press Release Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Pittsburgh, PA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT By ENInews staffPosted May 30, 2012 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Featured Events Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Shreveport, LA Ecumenical & Interreligious The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Curate Diocese of Nebraska Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Anglican Communion, Tags Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Comments are closed. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Comments (3) Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Washington, DC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Course Director Jerusalem, Israel last_img read more

Central Pennsylvania: Elaine Ellis Thomas ordained

first_img Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Featured Jobs & Calls Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Tags Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Central Pennsylvania: Elaine Ellis Thomas ordained Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Washington, DC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Press Release Service Posted Apr 30, 2014 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Martinsville, VA Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET [Diocese of Central Pennsylvania] The Rt. Rev. Nathan Baxter ordained into the priesthood on Tuesday April 29, the Rev. Elaine Ellis Thomas. The ordination took place at St. Edward’s Church, Lancaster, Pennsylvania. The Rev. Claire Nevin-Field, assistant rector, St. Peter’s Church, Philadelphia, was the preacher. Choirs from St. Edwards, Lancaster; St. James’, Lancaster and St. Peter’s Church in the Great Valley, Malvern participated in the service.  Thomas will be assisting at St. Edward’s, Lancaster. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 center_img Director of Music Morristown, NJ Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Hopkinsville, KY Submit an Event Listing Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Featured Events Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Albany, NY Rector Collierville, TN Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Belleville, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA People Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Submit a Press Release Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, MElast_img read more

Brazil: Archbishop welcomes Olympic sportspeople but criticizes organizers

first_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Submit an Event Listing Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Tags Director of Music Morristown, NJ Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem [Anglican Communion News Service] The primate of Brazil has given a warm welcome to the athletes and visitors of the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro, while criticizing the games’ administrators for serious mismanagement. Archbishop Francisco de Assis da Silva of the Episcopal Anglican Church of Brazil said that the Olympic Games “bring together the peoples of the world through healthy competition in several individual and team sports” and provide the opportunity to “encounter, learn, and share the world’s diversity.”Full article. Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Brazil: Archbishop welcomes Olympic sportspeople but criticizes organizers Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Featured Events South America Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Tampa, FL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK By Gavin DrakePosted Aug 11, 2016 Rector Collierville, TN In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Shreveport, LA TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Submit a Job Listing Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA center_img Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Anglican Communion, Rector Bath, NC Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Smithfield, NC Course Director Jerusalem, Israel An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Youth Minister Lorton, VA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJlast_img read more

CDSP prepares seminarians for public life

first_imgCDSP prepares seminarians for public life Training in community organizing added to its core curriculum Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing September 14, 2016 at 4:31 pm When I was in graduate school(social work) in the ’60s) community organization&development was basic to the core curriculum in the helping professions; and later I taught community organization at the university level (practicum/internship)for graduate students facilitating leadership and collaboration,communication,cooperation in our diverse,multicultural communities and society. Now it is so encouraging that our usually dynamic and progressive Episcopal schools of theology are catching up to this longstanding critical demand in our American society and world! Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Director of Music Morristown, NJ October 5, 2016 at 2:22 pm Wonderful news, so proud of my school! I have had a bumper-sticker on my car for years: “Jesus was a Community Organizer.” Actions speak louder than words! AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis April Love-Fordham says: September 13, 2016 at 6:49 am This is wonderful!! Thank you CDSP!!! September 13, 2016 at 4:13 pm Love this! Thank you for all the work it took to think about the Church’s needs, the global community’s needs, students’ needs – knitting together core values and effective educational delivery systems. Bravo! Izabella Sempari says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Dr. Erna Lund says: Dr Jenny Te Paa Daniel says: Rector Smithfield, NC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA [Episcopal News Service] Preparing future priests to lead congregations in today’s world also means training them for public life at Church Divinity School of the Pacific in Berkeley, California.Two years ago the seminary began an overhaul of its curriculum, refocusing its Master of Divinity program on three core Christian concepts: mission, discipleship and evangelism. Along with that, it committed to educating seminarians in the skills of critical reflection, contextual analysis and public conversation, for which training them in community organizing plays a role.The Very Rev. W. Mark Richardson, the president and dean of Church Divinity School of the Pacific, during last year’s Industrial Areas Foundation training. Photo: CDSP“We were trying to make a shift in our curriculum and were looking for a tighter fit between the life of faith and public life,” said the Very Rev. W. Mark Richardson, the president and dean of CDSP, in an interview in his office with Episcopal News Service.“To develop confident leaders at the interface of faith and public life … that’s a 21st-century way, we think, of approaching the question of mission,” he added.For many Episcopalians, it’s clear that to be the church in the world means to be present in the communities and to take an active interest in improving people’s lives. In recent years, some Episcopal bishops increasingly have called for their clergy not only to be pastors but to be entrepreneurs, public theologians and faith-based community organizers.“Bishops were saying increasingly that community organizing is a good thing,” said the Rev. Susanna Singer, an associate professor of ministry development and the director for CDSP’s Doctor of Ministry program. “We’ve always had our seminarians do clinical pastoral education in hospitals to learn the in-depth pastoral skills, but some bishops started to say that we want them to learn in-depth organizing skills.”The Christian faith, she added, is all about God’s vision of flourishing for humanity and the cosmos. “It means that the body of Christ, which is us now, has got to get out there now and be involved in the communities in which we live because that’s where God’s dream is going to come true.”To train its seminarians, CDSP turned for help to the Industrial Areas Foundation, a network of faith and community-based organizations that has trained leaders and empowered communities since 1940.In 2013, the seminary and IAF began offering the weeklong Organizing for Public Ministry course based on the national IAF leadership training in the religious, educational, labor and community context. Previously a six-day elective, beginning this fall it’s a requirement for incoming seminarians.“The intention is to train ordinary people both in giving them a conceptual framework for thinking about issues of power and self-interest and leadership as well as some of the practical skills of engaging people who are different than you out in the broader world,” said Anna Eng, lead organizer for the Bay Area Industrial Areas Foundation, in a telephone interview with ENS.Participants learn, she added, how to lead a meeting and have productive conversations. Many IAF leaders come from a religious context, so partnering with the seminary, which in addition to the practical training, facilities a theological discussion, makes sense.CDSP not only offers the course, it’s also an IAF member.The course focuses on developing skills, tools, and theoretical and reflective capacities for community organizing around multiple issues in the context of ministry. IAF leaders provide the practical nuts-and-bolts training and CDSP faculty lead theological reflections.Jennifer Snow, CDSP’s director of extended learning and an assistant professor of practical theology, facilitated the theological reflections during the last year’s IAF training. Photo: CDSPJennifer Snow, CDSP’s director of extended learning and an assistant professor of practical theology, facilitated the theological reflections during the latest IAF training. Seminarians participate in a daily theological reflection. They write papers preceding and following the training and are required to read assigned articles and books, including Jeffrey Stout’s “Blessed Are the Organized: Grassroots Democracy in America.”In the first paper, based on the readings, seminarians reflect on the relationship between broad-based community organizing and faithful leadership. Most seminarians say, “working for social justice is important, therefore community organizing is important,” not realizing they conflate the two, said Snow.“Community organizing is a strategy for working for justice,” she said, students making the distinction is a desired outcome of the course. “They should be able to realize and articulate why this as a strategy has a biblical and theological mandate for faith communities, not that it’s the same thing.”It’s an important distinction to make: Community organizing is a specific strategy that emerges from a specific context and specific needs, said Snow.“If you go into it thinking, ‘I have to work for justice because the Book of Micah tells me so, and Jesus tells me so, and, therefore, I have to do community organizing,’ that’s in the end not very convincing,” she said. “Because community organizing is a specific strategy not only about working for justice but about approaching power in a relational way as opposed to a ‘power over’ way.”As it turns out, changing people’s perception of power is critical.“It involves thinking differently about power: building relationships with people, inviting people in to share the power with you as a leader. It’s a very specific strategy about trying to reach a more just society in our particular context,” Snow said.Understanding and embracing power as a positive force initially can be an unsettling process.“Most of us have a negative connotation with power because we’ve been on the losing end of it and we’ve seen it abused,” said Eng, adding that power is not an innately bad thing.“Power is actually very good. You cannot do anything without power,” she said. “From the Christian tradition, the entire Bible is full of examples of a powerful God operating through a powerful people who are hesitant to exercise their power. So in many ways, it’s getting back into the Christian tradition.“Part of it is helping people reclaim that, the notion of the power that raised Christ from the dead is within you: Reclaim that, own that and not be scared by that. But we’ve seen a lot of misuse of power, and we’ve experienced it, so it makes sense that people shy away from it.”Seminarian Sarah Thomas’s view of power changed immediately.The Rev. Susanna Singer, an associate professor of ministry development and the director for CDSP’s Doctor of Ministry program, helped to reshape the Master of Divinity curriculum to include community organizing training. Photo: CDSP“On the very first day, we were challenged to see how often we – especially women – give our power away the minute we open our mouths,” she wrote in an email to ENS. “I was encouraged to claim my power and speak without apologizing. This was an important lesson for me as a future leader. I learned how to build one-on-one relationships by listening deeply, allowing my curiosity to lead and asking the right questions.”“I have become bolder and more open,” said Thomas, who lives in Santa Barbara and who takes online courses and spends four weeks on campus annually.Founded in 1893 to train clergy for ministry in the West, CDSP is a founding member of the Graduate Theological Union. It is one of seven seminaries in northeast Berkeley just blocks from the University of California campus, with Jewish, Hindu, Muslim, Orthodox, Swedenborgian and evangelical centers. GTU member school San Francisco Theological Seminary is in nearby San Anselmo, Marin County.It’s in this ecumenical, interfaith and secular context that seminarians participate with rabbis, businessmen, students and others in the course.“The mix of perspectives and opinions was really diverse, so that was really educational, to be in there with someone who has been in business their whole life. A retired CEO has a very different perspective than me,” said Aaron Klinefelter, a seminarian from the Diocese of Southeast Ohio.Klinefelter, now in his second year, enrolled in seminary knowing that he would have to do more than lead a parish, that he would be expected to participate in public and community life.“I certainly knew that going into this,” he said during an interview with ENS at Brewed Awakening, a coffee shop down the hill from the seminary, adding that this way of thinking is still somewhat new in the Episcopal Church. “I’m not sure why it’s a new thing that people are realizing that members have left the building.”– Lynette Wilson is an editor/reporter for Episcopal News Service. Press Release Service Rector Shreveport, LA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Hopkinsville, KY Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Lynette Wilson Posted Sep 12, 2016 Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID September 12, 2016 at 6:41 pm That’s my school!! So proud to belong, so committed to this wonderful theological educational vision for those offering themselves in the service of those who are the least . . . Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Featured Events Rector Tampa, FL Submit a Press Release Curate Diocese of Nebraska Theological Education Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Washington, DC Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Martinsville, VA Tags Comments (5) Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rhian Jeong says: Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Belleville, IL New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Albany, NYlast_img read more

Lee church changes name: Confederate general dropped to return to…

first_imgLee church changes name: Confederate general dropped to return to ‘Grace’ By David PaulsenPosted Sep 19, 2017 September 21, 2017 at 7:48 am Excellent coverage of a complex story of deep discernment by a small community. The only fact that was not disclosed here is that the prior vote that failed was in fact a majority vote but the leadership (rightfully) decided on a supermajority standard for this decision. This had the effect of slowing down the process but getting to the right place in the right way. Proud to call myself an Episcopalian today. Kathleen Whiting says: Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Advocacy Peace & Justice, Racial Justice & Reconciliation Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector Collierville, TN September 19, 2017 at 6:10 pm What a joke. AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis September 21, 2017 at 4:27 pm Very unfortunate that as an Episcopalian I find yet another move by aChurch in the Episocplalian faith in the United States do an underhanded and irresponsible act. If you think your decision to rename your church will heal any divisions you are sadly mistaken. What your church has done has deepened the rift that is prevelant in the Episcopal Church in the United States. Churches such as the one in this article decide to drive the rift in the faithful so they can be more in “today’s world.” Compromise to the sad political correctness that drives away members is all about making the church into their own image and not based on faith. There are thousands leaving the Episcopal Church in the United States because of unwise and unwarranted actions such as this church. I may be listed as an Episcoplian officially, but in reality my finances and tithing has not been given to the Episcopal Church for the last nine years. And after knowing about changing the name of your church because you’re ashamed of a truly noble man, I’m glad I made the decision to leave the Episcopal Church and will continue to advise others to do the same. ronald freeman says: Sr. Dawna Clare Sutton, CG says: Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS September 19, 2017 at 9:16 pm NO, as an outsider, I see this decision to be one that righted history…Lee was a pro-slavery person and worked hard at defeating the Reconstruction efforts. While he took an oath of allegiance to the US he broke that oath by joining the confederate army, while many of his Virginia military officers fought with the North. He was saved from a charge of treason by General Grant.He also separated a slave family of his, selling the woman to one family and her child to another.So, it is not hatred motivating the name change; it is reverting to a past name. Ronald Davin says: TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab September 19, 2017 at 11:12 pm Emotive based, Stalinist historical revision and sanitation. Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ September 21, 2017 at 7:46 am Forgiveness? Seems to me it’s bound up in Grace. Rector Pittsburgh, PA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME September 20, 2017 at 2:07 am Too bad that the congregation did not have a Congregational meeting to verify the vote. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Priscilla Johnstone says: Rector Knoxville, TN September 19, 2017 at 9:10 pm I thought David Paulsen would have served us better had the headline emphasized the restoration of the original name of the parish and the heeding of General Lee’s wishes. That we have Confederate dignitaries associated with Episcopal institutions is certainly, to borrow a phrase, an inconvenient truth. That we have bishops who held Conventions knowing that blacks would not have equal access to hotels and restaurants, yet did nothing is another. “They were men of their times,” we used to say. The history I read tells me that our country would not have been founded at all had it not been for the compromise over slavery. That seems to be the inconvenient truth we can’t yet address. Going back to re-fight the 80 some-odd year run-up to the Civil War will only encourage revenge and more regret. The past can’t be changed, but it can be redeemed. The means of redemption have been the subject of the past several Sundays: Christ, Cross, Reconciliation, Forgiveness, Grace. I think the Presiding Bishop has us on just the right path. Let’s worry less about keeping up with the latest politically correct issue. Let’s focus on this part of the Jesus Movement and see where he takes us. Thomas K. Chu, Esq. says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Joel Morris says: September 20, 2017 at 12:49 pm The argument that changining the name of the church back to the original name is “rewriting history” is a specious one. You said in your own reply that one cannot change history. One can rewrite history books in a biased way, which undoubtedly what the Soviets did (quite common in authoritarian regimes). Glorifying a man who turned his back on his country and served a rebellion whose purpose was to continue a system of enslavement in the economic interests of the South, is simply wrong. The Episcopal Church is one who proclaims the all are welcome ( there is no but…). If I were African American I would call that hypocritical and would certainly not feel welcome.As some have said in their replies that Lee had admiral and heroic qualities does not alter the fact of his treason against his country. I’m sure there were many Nazis in WW!! who had admirabli traits and heroic qualities, but I doubt that there are any memorials are churches named after any of them. I will be pleased to attend Brace Episcopal if I find myself in Lexington. I doubt if I would be without the name change. The church did the right thing. Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Comments (33) Larry Waters says: P.J. Cabbiness says: John Miller says: September 20, 2017 at 3:57 pm One wonders if the members of the parish were given an opportunity to vote in this decision and were in agreement with the decision. My guess is they were not and the decision was made by the Vestry. I hope my guess was wrong. Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR David Paulsen says: September 20, 2017 at 9:47 am Bob Marsh, your note on the headline is well taken, and I have updated it to indicate more clearly that the church “returned” to an earlier name. I would also add that although the Episcopal Church’s historic complicity with slavery and segregation isn’t common knowledge among all Episcopalians, it is something that the church has and is dealing with directly. General Convention has passed numerous resolutions on the topic, including resolutions like this one that seek to confront sins of the past on the path toward reconciliation: https://www.episcopalarchives.org/cgi-bin/acts/acts_resolution.pl?resolution=2009-A143 Joe Owen says: John Miller says: Tony Oberdorfer says: Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Alexander Scott says: September 20, 2017 at 4:14 pm Joel Morris stated that all are welcomed in TEC and there are no buts. Really? I’m beginning to doubt that. To borrow from the novel Animal Farm, All are equal but some are more equal than others. Replace the word equal with welcome and you have the Episcopal Church in a nutshell. If you don’t believe that just ask any conservative member. And just for the record Joel I AM African-American and would not feel unwelcome in the least if I worshiped in a church that had confederate images on the stained glass. I tend to be old school and judge how the people in the congregation treat me in deciding whether or not I am welcomed. If I feel unwelcomed in TEC it is not because of any confederate symbols that might still be in a parish. It is because of my conservative viewpoints. In this denomination conservatives are at best totally ignored by the clergy and many of the members and at worse ridiculed by them. Maybe someday after they are all done congratulating each other on the purging of anything having to do with the confederacy from any and all parishes, maybe, just maybe they’ll get around to welcoming and involving conservative members in the future of this church. If indeed it has a future. Larry Waters says: September 21, 2017 at 11:23 am Amen to R. Davin’s post about devastation in several states. Perhaps all of us can write a check to the E. Relief and Development Fund. Regardless of one’s political views, people/pets etc. need help now! Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Ed Lane says: Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH September 20, 2017 at 12:09 pm That General Lee himself was evidently opposed to the creation of memorials in his honor would have been reason enough to oppose the renaming of Grace Church in 1903 despite his intimate association with the church. But the decision by self-righteous vestrymen to revert to the original name 114 years later, despite their denials, is clearly a political act motivated fundamentally by the left-wing proclivities of the day. I am cynical enough to suggest that there may be a few parishioners at the church who regret their having no stained glass to remove as has the Washington National Cathedral. In any case the whole affair is another black mark against today’s Episcopal Church which will cause far more people to leave than it will attract. Comments are closed. Jeffrey Cox says: F William Thewalt says: September 22, 2017 at 7:35 pm I am not a member of Grace Episcopal Church.I do laud the effort to confront our country’s history, especially the Civil War. I am a Northern and I tend to see our mutual history as a story of our Nation reborn. I am also a newbie from the RC and I love the Episcopal church, even its flaws and sinfulness (for so am I). When I was contemplating the history of the Episcopal Church before the Civil War and after it was a revelation what happen to the church after the Civil War. History may change and even get rewritten, but for those who can remain open and truly read the “real” history answers are always there. If Lee didn’t want to have a church named after him and now it goes back to its “original” name I see choice to move forward as a Christian opening to the “Grace” of the moment. What is our “original” history? Always go back your true roots find it. You will be in my prayers, we are all in this together and today with all the current needs in our own country let alone in the world, let us move forward in reconciliation together with/ in Christ our Savior Jim Newman says: David Paulsen says: center_img Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET The sign in front of R.E. Lee Memorial Church bears the name of the church and, therefore, also the Confederate general who was a parishioner there. Photo: Lee Memorial Church via Facebook[Episcopal News Service] R.E. Lee Memorial Church in Lexington, Virginia, where Robert E. Lee once served as senior warden will no longer honor the Confederate general in its name.After two years of tense debate in the congregation, the vestry voted, 7-5, on Sept. 18 to change the church’s name to its previous Grace Episcopal Church. The decision had been backed publicly by Southwestern Virginia Bishop Mark Bourlakas, who spoke to the congregation earlier this month.“It’s been a costly process both spiritually, financially and emotionally for the congregation, but I’m proud of their work and encouraged by it,” Bourlakas told Episcopal News Service by phone Sept. 19.The vestry’s past inaction on the name had prompted some to leave the church. Others were steadfast in favor of keeping the name to honor Lee. Episcopalians on both sides of the issue filled the church when Bourlakas spoke there Sept. 7, and they again gave competing views this week before the vestry’s vote.Violence last month during a white supremacist rally in Charlottesville, Virginia, has amplified the national debate over Confederate symbols in public places, including at Episcopal institutions. For many of those institutions, the debate began two years ago after the massacre at a black church in Charleston, South Carolina, by a gunman with Confederate sympathies.“It’s been a very divisive issue for two years,” the Rev. Tom Crittenden, the Lexington church’s rector, told the Richmond Times-Dispatch. “But Charlottesville seems to have moved us to this point. Not that we have a different view of Lee historically in our church, but we have appreciation for our need to move on.”Hate groups chose Charlottesville because of that city’s decision to remove a statue of Lee. Clashes with anti-racism counterprotesters ended in numerous injuries and the death of one counterprotester.Washington National Cathedral in the nation’s capital responded by removing stained-glass windows depicting Lee and a fellow Confederate general, Stonewall Jackson. Christ Church Cathedral in Cincinnati, Ohio, launched a study of its own memorials to Confederate figures after the dean called for their removal.Defenders of such memorials have warned against hiding history, and some say Confederate generals displayed heroic qualities despite fighting on the side of the slave-holding South. Those arguments have been countered by critics who rebuke efforts to portray the Confederate cause as noble.The congregation in Lexington faced the additional challenge of confronting the legacy of a Confederate figure closely tied to its own identity.While serving in Lexington as president of Washington College, later renamed Washington and Lee University, the former Confederate general spent the last five years of his life, until his death in 1870, helping the struggling congregation survive. There is no record, however, of why the congregation chose to rename the church for Lee in 1903.Members of Lee Memorial Church spent several months in 2015 discussing the church name in light of the Charleston shooting. After surveying the congregation and hearing a range of opinions for and against, the vestry narrowly voted that November to keep the name unchanged.Then in 2016, the church hired an outside consultant and formed the Discovery and Discernment Committee of vestry members and parishioners to more carefully pursue reconciliation among the congregation and decide what actions to take.The committee and consultant issued a 15-page report in April 2017 that summarized the various perspectives on the church’s name and recommended “that the name of the church be officially restored to its former name of Grace Episcopal Church.” The vestry met the same month to review the report and accepted all the recommendations, except the one urging a name change.“It is extremely difficult to get people to change their position and their understanding of facts when it’s so bound up with identity,” vestry member Doug Cumming, who favored the name change, told ENS. “But it was time.”The discussion reignited after the violence in Charlottesville renewed questions about whether it was appropriate to name a church after a Confederate general. With members of the vestry still resisting a change, Bourlakas took a more active role in the conversations, visiting the church in late August and coordinating a three-city lecture series on racial reconciliation that kicked off in Lexington on Sept. 13.The bishop, in recommending a name change, tried to focus the congregation on its Christian mission, which he said should not be hindered by distractions like disagreements over a name or Confederate statues.“There’s still an amount of healing that will have to take place,” Bourlakas said. “In the long run, I think the church will be stronger and will be a strong gospel witness in Lexington.”– David Paulsen is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] September 19, 2017 at 11:24 pm Isn’t Lee buried in the church? What happened to all the Confederate flags in the church? September 20, 2017 at 11:41 am I fully agree that the congregation may change the name of their church to anything that they desire. However, the name change is precipitated by the desire of the EC to be seen an “activist church”, i.e., a church that is easily led by folks who are determined to destroy our country. Also, where is the “forgiveness for our sins” that Christians [Episcopalians] espouse? As others have previously sadi, in this thread, these types of actions [removing statues, changing names] remind us more of communism than our society. BTW, why does the EC not talk about the violent radical left group, which attacked the group that had a permit to march? Submit a Press Release September 19, 2017 at 6:31 pm That was brief and to the point, Ed, but fails to honor the difficult discernment process of this parish. I applaud them for this move, not as a way of “rewriting history” but rather as a return to a previous identity that was not bound up in a single person but in the grace of God. Truly, an extension of grace. September 20, 2017 at 9:50 am Lee is not buried in this church. You likely are referring to Lee Chapel on the campus of Washington and Lee University, also in Lexington, Virginia. https://www.wlu.edu/lee-chapel-and-museum/about-the-chapel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Richmond Parker says: Rector Tampa, FL September 20, 2017 at 10:26 am There is wisdom in naming a church after one of God’s attributes or one His Saints as is traditionally done. Press Release Service Featured Jobs & Calls Hamilton Jones says: This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Washington, DC James Sivley says: September 20, 2017 at 9:23 am I am a 1963 graduate of W&L and worshiped in that Church for 4 years. Glad they changed they name back to Grace! The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Featured Events The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Tom Sramek, Jr. says: September 19, 2017 at 6:48 pm I recently read a modern biography of Robert E. Lee titled PATHS OF GLORY : THE LIFE AND LEGEND OF ROBERT E. LEE by Michael Korda , who had access to a number of records not used previously by other biographers . I also am reading RECOLLECTIONS AND LETTERS OF ROBERT E . LEE . When I was a student at Hobart College in Geneva , New York , we all had to take a course in American history . The main text used in the course was by Morrison and Commager , highly reputable historians . They said that Lee was a truly great American , of the same caliber of character as George Washington . I suggest that people read for themselves , and not form prejudiced opinions not based on historical fact . Respectfully Submitted for Your consideration . Richmond Parker , from Yankee -Land in Central New York . Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA September 19, 2017 at 9:17 pm You need to read more bios on Lee. Michael Korda’s book is considered a hagiography. The NYTimes pointed out some very serious flaws in Lee. I suggest you widen your reading on Lee. September 21, 2017 at 9:18 am Parts of Houston, and its people are still in a terrible mess, parts of Florida and its people are in a state of devastation, it appears that Puerto Rico are to be added to the list, while the church’s efforts and its pride are in a churches name change. Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Bath, NC September 20, 2017 at 12:41 am Saints are “individual mortal humans.” Just who are we to decide that somewhat is not “worthy.”This entire sense of “purging” is a tragedy for our church. Of course to insult “poor, clay-eating” southerners seems to be acceptable. Sadly it shows the ignorance of “activist” in our church. What makes it less painful is to realize how few people care one way or the other what the Episcopal Church does anymore. Enjoy the purging of history and the ridiculous actions of the radical left, but do realize that because of behavior and actions like this the Episcopal Church will continue to decline. The stain glass windows of Lee and Jackson were in the National Cathedral to show that we were again a “united nation,” certainly not to promote slavery. The Cathedral actually had the gall to “deconsecrate” memorials that were given and installed in the Cathedral. I have to say that at this time I am ashamed to be an Episcopalian. Associate Rector Columbus, GA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books John Simpson says: Thomas K. Chu, Esq. says: Bob Marsh says: September 19, 2017 at 7:45 pm This is the best decision. Lee himself never wanted his name to interfere with the reconciliation that he worked for after the War. I think that he would prefer art and statuary of him (if it must be) to show him with books in his hands. Perhaps another view would be of him kneeling for Communion beside a former slave. Notwithstanding, the noise that made this change happen is disturbing. That feelings. ignorance and caricatures would become a credible basis for evaluating issues and reputations is doomed to disaster. At the end of it all it must be remembered that the Congress valorized and made all Confederate soldiers United States veterans. After the War both North and South reconciled and Confederates were given amnesty to just go home without shame or blame attached. It was as though it was finally seen that powerful forces had trapped the country before the War and both sides regretted their acts, but firmly believed that they acted on honor. This is not finished. Thomas Jefferson and George Washington will soon be under the iconoclast glare. September 19, 2017 at 6:42 pm it is sade to see you think you can change history . i was named after lee and i am very happy with it,and have no .sham in it…i feel sorry for your church that you still have hate in you hearts.ron Tags Submit an Event Listing September 19, 2017 at 7:19 pm It is a sad day…..Identity politics wins again. It is no surprise that the people are leaving the church in droves… Submit a Job Listing September 19, 2017 at 9:59 pm I imagine all of us could have some “very serious flaws” pointed out.It’s terrible we’re are allowing radicals on “both sides” to dictate our decisions. September 19, 2017 at 7:49 pm I find it interesting that some are upset by a Church reclaiming its original name. An Episcopalian for 58 of my 71 years, I have always treasured the tendency of our denomination to name Churches for Saints or religious precepts, not for individual mortal humans. Discernment and civil debate over such a serious issue has apparently found an answer for the communicants in Lexington. We should respect their decision and only wish them God’s peace, this day and always. Rector Shreveport, LA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA September 21, 2017 at 7:58 am The reference about the prior vote is in the Richmond Times-Dispatch’s correction to its own story: http://www.richmond.com/news/virginia/congregation-once-led-by-robert-e-lee-votes-to-remove/article_30d0557f-c3c0-5be2-8a28-308159dd662c.html September 19, 2017 at 8:52 pm How nice to follow the USSR in an attempt to re-write history. One cannot change history. It is what is. How sad that the PC folks have taken over. Now that this has been done, it will be interesting to see how quickly this church grows and prospers. I suspect ENS will not tell us. Hamilton Jones says: An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Curate Diocese of Nebraska In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY September 19, 2017 at 8:06 pm I grew up in New England, where I learned that northern Protestant churches were in the vanguard of the abolitionist movement. It was many years before it dawned on me that southern churches were pursuing the exact opposite position. Ultimately, slavery was abolished at a great price for both sides. The South was not punished, rather precedence was given to reconciliation and healing of our nation. I would hope that, from our perspective of well over a century, we could all agree to continue that concept of reconciliation and healing, and now also recognize that blacks were never included in that process, nor have we ever fully acknowledged the damage done to those held in slavery. Please, let us pray for healing in our nation, for welcoming people who may not agree with us or look like us. Can we try to hold love in our hearts, rather than judgement, and seek peace among our people. Terry Francis says: Rector Belleville, IL Charles B. Allen II says: Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Hopkinsville, KY Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector Smithfield, NC Father Mike Waverly-Shank says: Doug Desper says: last_img read more

Dance by the light of the moon

first_img 2 COMMENTS Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment.     It was the day before thanksgiving, 1948.  I was 14 years old.  We had an early Illinois snow that year and the ground was covered with a fluffy white mantle.    In the moonlight, the snow enshrouded woodland glowed in a mysterious, almost magical half–light.  My steps were muffled by the soft snow as I moved forward.  It was one of those special, otherworldly, northern winter nights when I ordinarily wouldn’t expect to be surprised because the very act of being there was a miracle. How could there possibly be more?   And yet, well, its times like that when the unexpected happens, when all nature holds her breath, waiting, but waiting for what?  Suddenly, unexpectedly I saw something move. A rabbit, a Molly cottontail, sat there on her powder–puff tail as she silently surveyed the small clearing.  A second rabbit joined the first, and then, two more.  Quite suddenly one of the rabbits dashed across the clearing and stopped on the far side.  Another rabbit ventured out into the clearing, stomped its hind feet rapidly only to dash away again, leaving behind that barely audible whisper of sound, ‘Thump, Thump, Thump.  Soon that tiny, magical, moon-bright glade was full of rabbits, perhaps as many as a dozen, all racing into the clearing, stomping their strange but wonderful dance, dashing here and there, in a whirlwind of small furry bodies.   I watched as at times two rabbits would approach each other and briefly touch noses in greeting, or so it seemed, and then they would be off again about their wild capricious dance.  The soft snow was soon packed down as those many, little fairy, furry feet thumped and then thump, thumped again, until magically; all the rabbits were dancing their mysterious arabesque.   Oh God, how I wanted to join them, to dance with them.  Can what I saw those many years ago be anything less than that; a wild, spontaneous dance? The rabbits danced with boundless enthusiasm and joy that night.  What might have possessed them?  I cannot explain it. I would like to see it again, wouldn’t you? I love the moon illustration. Please enter your name here Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter  Like so many rabbits dancing in the light of a winter moon, perhaps God is calling you and I to dance the dance of life with joy and enthusiastic thanksgiving.  While the rabbits danced individually, their joy seemed to only reach its zenith when they danced as a wild community.  We too are called to dance individually as well as together.  When was the last time you danced like that? Charles Towne is a longtime resident of Apopka, member of Inspire Church and a published author. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom Reply Mama Mia Charles Towne Reply center_img TAGSCharles TowneInspiration Previous articleFive great choices for 2016 Christmas albumsNext articleCyber Monday: A buyer’s guide to bargains Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address here December 4, 2016 at 4:29 pm Well, what can I say, it isn’t moonlight but it is rabbits dancing! Keep the comments coming, and thanks. Charles Towne LEAVE A REPLY Cancel reply November 28, 2016 at 12:37 am Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 InspirationBy Charles Towne UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 Please enter your comment!last_img read more