Scoreboard Roundup — 3/16/18

first_imgMarch 16, 2018 /Sports News – National Scoreboard Roundup — 3/16/18 NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEFinal  Washington   7  N-Y Islanders   3Final  Columbus     5  Philadelphia    3Final  Toronto      5  Buffalo         2Final  Pittsburgh   5  Montreal        3Final  Florida      3  Boston          0Final  Winnipeg     6  Chicago         2Final  Colorado     4  St. Louis       1Final  L.A. Kings   4  Detroit         1Final  Nashville    3  Arizona         2 TOP-25 COLLEGE BASKETBALLFinal  (2) Villanova       87  Radford             61Final  (4) Kansas          76  Penn                60Final  (7) Michigan        61  Montana             47Final  (8) Gonzaga         68  UNC-Greensboro      64Final  (9) Duke            89  Iona                67Final  Buffalo             89  (12) Arizona        68Final  (13) Tennessee      73  Wright St.          47Final  (14) Texas Tech     70  Stephen F. Austin   60Final  (17) Ohio St.       81  S. Dakota St.       73Final  (18) Kentucky       78  Davidson            73Final  (21) Houston        67  San Diego St.       65Final  Loyola of Chicago   64  (22) Miami          62Final  (23) Florida        77  St. Bonaventure     62Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved. Beau Lund INTERLEAGUEFinal  N-Y Yankees   9  Pittsburgh    5Final  Baltimore     1  St. Louis     0Final  Atlanta       8  Detroit       1Final  Houston      12  Washington    3Final  Texas         6  Milwaukee     5Final  Kansas City  14  L-A Dodgers   8Final  Cincinnati   10  Cleveland     6Final  L-A Angels   10  Colorado      8 (NEW YORK) —     Here are the scores from Thursday’s sports events: NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONFinal  Toronto       106  Indiana         99Final  Philadelphia  118  N-Y Knicks     110Final  Charlotte     129  Atlanta        117Final  Houston       101  L.A. Clippers   96Final  Chicago       111  Memphis        110Final  San Antonio    98  New Orleans     93Final  Utah          116  Phoenix         88Final  Denver        120  Detroit        113Final  Portland      113  Cleveland      105 AMERICAN LEAGUEFinal  Boston          7  Toronto      5Final  Minnesota       8  Tampa Bay    1Final  Chi White Sox   7  L-A Angels   2Final  Seattle         6  Oakland      2 NATIONAL LEAGUEFinal  Miami       7  N-Y Mets        6Final  Arizona     3  Chi Cubs        2Final  San Diego   9  San Francisco   7 Written by NATIONAL HOCKEY LEAGUEFinal  Washington   7  N-Y Islanders   3Final  Columbus     5  Philadelphia    3Final  Toronto      5  Buffalo         2Final  Pittsburgh   5  Montreal        3Final  Florida      3  Boston          0Final  Winnipeg     6  Chicago         2Final  Colorado     4  St. Louis       1Final  L.A. Kings   4  Detroit         1Final  Nashville    3  Arizona         2 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail iStock/Thinkstock(NEW YORK) —     Here are the scores from Thursday’s sports events:  INTERLEAGUEFinal  N-Y Yankees   9  Pittsburgh    5Final  Baltimore     1  St. Louis     0Final  Atlanta       8  Detroit       1Final  Houston      12  Washington    3Final  Texas         6  Milwaukee     5Final  Kansas City  14  L-A Dodgers   8Final  Cincinnati   10  Cleveland     6Final  L-A Angels   10  Colorado      8 AMERICAN LEAGUEFinal  Boston          7  Toronto      5Final  Minnesota       8  Tampa Bay    1Final  Chi White Sox   7  L-A Angels   2Final  Seattle         6  Oakland      2 NATIONAL LEAGUEFinal  Miami       7  N-Y Mets        6Final  Arizona     3  Chi Cubs        2Final  San Diego   9  San Francisco   7 NATIONAL BASKETBALL ASSOCIATIONFinal  Toronto       106  Indiana         99Final  Philadelphia  118  N-Y Knicks     110Final  Charlotte     129  Atlanta        117Final  Houston       101  L.A. Clippers   96Final  Chicago       111  Memphis        110Final  San Antonio    98  New Orleans     93Final  Utah          116  Phoenix         88Final  Denver        120  Detroit        113Final  Portland      113  Cleveland      105 TOP-25 COLLEGE BASKETBALLFinal  (2) Villanova       87  Radford             61Final  (4) Kansas          76  Penn                60Final  (7) Michigan        61  Montana             47Final  (8) Gonzaga         68  UNC-Greensboro      64Final  (9) Duke            89  Iona                67Final  Buffalo             89  (12) Arizona        68Final  (13) Tennessee      73  Wright St.          47Final  (14) Texas Tech     70  Stephen F. Austin   60Final  (17) Ohio St.       81  S. Dakota St.       73Final  (18) Kentucky       78  Davidson            73Final  (21) Houston        67  San Diego St.       65Final  Loyola of Chicago   64  (22) Miami          62Final  (23) Florida        77  St. Bonaventure     62last_img read more

HMNZS TE MANA Welcomed Home

first_img View post tag: Navy View post tag: Defence Displacement3,600 tonnes full load View post tag: Welcomed Beam15 m View post tag: HMNZS Length118 m View post tag: Te March 12, 2014 [mappress]Naval Today Staff, March 12, 2014, Image: Royal New Zealand Navy FAMILIES WELCOME HMNZS TE MANA’S CREWThe Royal New Zealand Navy’s frigate HMNZS TE MANA returned this morning to Devonport Naval Base after a seven-month deployment. StatusIn active service About 700 family members along with three Seasprite helicopters welcomed TE MANA’s 182 Warriors of the Sea. The ship fired a 17-gun salute as she arrived, replied by a seven-gun salute from the shore battery.On Friday, 21 February 2014, HMNZS TE MANA completed her support to NATO’s counter-piracy task force as part of Operation OCEAN SHIELD. Task Force 508 (CTF-508) assigned TE MANA to counter-piracy operations off the Horn of Africa and Indian Ocean since 23 January, maintaining an overt presence off the northern beaches of Somalia and the Internationally Recognised Transit Corridor (IRTC) in the Gulf of Aden.TE MANA completed 62 maritime situational awareness visits during the deployment; including visits by her boarding teams onboard fishing and merchant dhows, and interacting with seafarers to reassure them of the NATO presence in the region.The ship’s Seasprite helicopter has conducted more than 40 flight hours of intelligence surveillance and reconnaissance for CTF-508, providing security over-watch of the IRTC and helping to ensure coalition units remain abreast of the vessel movements and potential piracy activity in the area. View post tag: home View post tag: Defense View post tag: News by topic HMNZS TE MANA SPECIFICATIONS View post tag: Mana View post tag: Naval Speed27 knots HMNZS TE MANA Welcomed Home View post tag: New Zealand Back to overview,Home naval-today HMNZS TE MANA Welcomed Home Complement178 Officers and ratings (25 Officers, 153 ratings) Share this articlelast_img read more

21 Homes Approved for Former Car Lot

first_imgJason Sciullo, an engineer for Klause Enterprises, describes the proposed housing project in a presentation to the Ocean City Planning Board. By Donald WittkowskiA large tract of land that Ocean City had hoped to buy and preserve as open space will instead be redeveloped for 21 single-family homes, under the latest plan by the property owners.Voting 6-0, the Ocean City Planning Board gave preliminary site plan approval Wednesday night to the housing project proposed by brothers Harry and Jerry Klause of Klause Enterprises.Encompassing nearly an entire block, the land is bordered by Simpson and Haven avenues between 16th and 17th streets and was formerly occupied by a now-closed Chevrolet dealership.Mayor Jay Gillian and City Council attempted to acquire the land from Klause Enterprises last year for $9 million, but the deal fell through when the community group Fairness In Taxes circulated a petition drive for a voter referendum to block the purchase.City officials wanted to preserve the land as public space to protect it from densely packed housing construction that would add to the town’s overdevelopment.“The city’s position is pretty simple: The mayor and Council don’t want to see the property developed with more housing,” city spokesman Doug Bergen said in earlier comments.An architectural rendering depicts the housing development.FIT’s leaders said they did not object to the city acquiring the property, but took issue with the proposed purchase price. They believed the city was going to grossly overpay for the land.Dave Hayes, FIT’s president, said Wednesday night he was never convinced that the city intended to keep the site as open space if it had spent $9 million to acquire it. At that price, the land would have simply been too valuable for the city to keep it vacant, he said.Hayes noted that some members of FIT may welcome the prospect of housing construction on the site, saying the addition of 21 new homes will create extra property tax revenue for the city.“It’s new tax revenue for the city, it lowers the tax rate and nice housing will be there,” he said in an interview.The planning board’s preliminary approval is the first step in redeveloping the site. Klause Enterprises would have to secure the board’s final approval before construction could begin on the project.Harry Klause, left, and his brother, Jerry, are the owners of Klause Enterprises.Harry and Jerry Klause attended the planning board meeting, but declined to comment afterward, referring all questions to their attorney, Avery Teitler.Teitler said there is no timetable yet for building the homes, pointing out that Klause Enterprises still must come back to the planning board for final approval.“Nothing has been set yet,” he said in an interview.Teitler did not rule out the possibility that Klause Enterprises could resume negotiations with the city at some point for a possible land sale.“I think there is always a possibility,” he said.In the meantime, the Klause brothers are proposing to build at least 21 single-family homes on the site. One lot that is a mere half-foot short for housing construction may be re-examined to see if it could serve as the location for a 22nd home, Teitler and other Klause representatives indicated to the planning board.Avery Teitler, attorney for Klause Enterprises, says the project “fully conforms” with Ocean City’s planning and zoning laws.Jason Sciullo, the engineer for Klause Enterprises, said the project is designed to blend in with the surrounding area and have “minimum impact.”The lot sizes for each home are larger than the city’s minimum standards by about 15 feet, allowing each house to have more yard space. In addition, the heights for each two-story home would be lower than what is allowed, making them more “respectful” of the neighborhood, Klause representatives said during a presentation to the planning board.As it stands, the project “fully conforms” with the city’s planning and zoning laws and would not need any variances, Teitler said.“It’s as good an application as you’re going to get,” he told the planning board members.Some board members indicated they would like to see a few changes to the project’s design to improve the aesthetics and drainage, but otherwise endorsed it.“I think the streetscape is wonderful in this project,” said John Loeper, the board chairman.John Loeper, center, the planning board chairman, praises the project’s streetscaping.The homes would replace a now-empty building and a sprawling blacktop and concrete lot that served as the location for the former Chevrolet dealership that once occupied the site.Christopher Halliday, the architect for Klause Enterprises, said each house would feature a unique design to give it “more visual interest and character.”“Each home has its own personal style,” Halliday said.A few residents had questions about the project during the planning board meeting. The questions mainly focused on whether the project would exacerbate flooding or result in the loss of public parking.Theresa McHale, a property owner at 1700 West Ave., maintained that the housing project seems contrary to the city’s long-range plans to ease flooding in local neighborhoods.“This, to me, is going to make it even worse,” McHale said of the flooding.Loeper responded that the new homes would feature lots that would actually help to absorb floodwaters.“It’s going from total concrete to something that absorbs,” he said.The former Chevrolet dealership at 16th Street and Simpson Avenue is part of a nearly full block of land the city wanted to buy to protect from housing development.last_img read more

Premier faces up to difficult trading, as cost rises hit home

first_imgPremier Foods has admitted that the timing of bread price rises last year and consumer concerns about its Hovis white bread played a significant part in losses of £73.5m for 2007, announced this week.Rocketing wheat prices were identified by the company as the main reason for a 48.4% fall in trading profits at its Bread Bakeries Division, which comprises RHM, taken over last year. But Hovis also lost market share because it was the first big bread brand to introduce price rises.The company raised prices in early September and late October, but said that competitors did not follow suit until the end of December, resulting in a price differential of up to 15p a loaf.Premier reported an increase of £150m in wheat costs in its preliminary results for 2007.The company also admitted quality issues with Hovis white bread. “In white bread, Premier lost market share because of customer feedback highlighting quality concerns,” said associate director Angharad Couch.Premier has now changed the recipe for Hovis white with a new blend of flours and longer baking times. Couch added that promotional activities across all Premier’s divisions will be limiited in the first half of 2008, as a new management information system is introduced.Premier’s chief executive Robert Schofield said it had made progress on integrating RHM and was on track to deliver annual synergies of £113m. “The downside to 2007 was the exceptional cost inflation. While we moved quickly to raise prices, the time lag between cost increases and raising prices reduced second-half profitability,” he said.Premier has already recovered £190m of the estimated £225m cost inflation in 2007 and plans to recover the remaining costs in the first quarter of 2008. Investec analyst Martin Deboo said: “Premier was flayed by rising wheat prices last year and had a difficult second half in its bread business. Going forward will be challenging, as the supermarkets are expected to be extremely aggressive on price negotiations this year.”last_img read more

Shpongle, Alex & Allyson Grey Sign On For Bicycle Day 75th Anniversary Tour

first_imgBicycle Day is the annual celebration of Swiss scientist Albert Hoffman’s first intentional ingestion of the chemical compound, LSD-25, after accidentally discovering the compound’s psychedelic nature three days earlier. Named for Hoffman’s trippy bicycle ride home from the lab that fateful day, each year on April 19th, folks come together to celebrate the world’s first acid trip back in 1943. This year, Bicycle Day will be celebrating its 75th anniversary, and the folks at Euphonic Conceptions and Legion of Bloom Music have something really special cooked up to celebrate the landmark year.Last year, the promoters continued their annual San Francisco tradition, bringing musicians, visual artists, and speakers together to pay tribute to America’s counterculture and all things psychedelic at the home city of one of the largest Bicycle Day celebrations in the world. This year, in honor of the day’s 75th anniversary, Euphonic Conceptions and Legion of Bloom Music will take their celebration on the world, hosting three parties over three days in three cities across the United States. Thus far, renowned visionary artists Alex Grey and Allyson Grey have signed on to return for the event in addition to internationally acclaimed producer Shpongle (Simon Posford live) and CharlestheFirst.On Bicycle Day proper, April 19th, the event will return to its home at The Midway in San Francisco, the larger venue that the event moved to last year. The following day, on April 20th—which has become a holiday for users of a different (sometimes) illegal substance—the party will move south and take over The Mayan in Los Angeles. Rounding out the weekend, the Bicycle Day tour will hit New Orleans for a performance at the Joy Theater on April 21st.Tickets for the various stops on the Bicycle Day 75th Anniversary tour are currently on sale. For the 4/19 San Francisco show, head here. For the 4/20 Los Angeles show, click here. For the 4/21 New Orleans show, head here.Watch the 2017 recap video of Bicycle Day below!last_img read more

Earth Day at 40

first_imgHarvard celebrated the 40th anniversary of Earth Day this week (April 22) with earnest lectures, probing conferences, sunlit outdoor fairs — and green dinner trays.Campuswide, dinner featured an Earth-friendly menu of local and regional foods that support area producers and minimize transportation pollution.Harvard University Hospitality and Dining Services (HUHDS) put it all together. It was one of several “sustainable dinner” nights since October 2008, when the University used a special dinner to celebrate its pledge to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Since then, there has been a sustainable dinner night each fall and one each spring, on or around Earth Day.But don’t be fooled, said HUHDS spokeswoman Crista Martin. Mealtime at Harvard is sustainable every day, to the degree it is possible to serve food drawn in from 250 miles away or less.“Most of the [April 22] menu features items that are available consistently,” she said. “But it’s wonderful to highlight in one big delicious night what’s happening every day.”Here’s a taste of Harvard’s Earth Day menu: borscht from local beets, Maine lobster bisque, and Vermont herb-roasted chicken. Add in tomatoes Provençal and garlic mashed potatoes (from Maine produce). And there was local four-berry pie and tri-color tortellini. The mixed green salad (organic) was served with vinaigrette made from local dried cranberries and Vermont maple syrup.At Annenberg Hall, a long table was set with a Vermont cheese board, vats of Vermont butter, and baskets piled with locally baked brown rolls.All the undergraduate Houses featured the same menu, along with Dudley Café and the Cronkhite Dining Room. A placard reminded students of the food-sustainability link, as did flip cards on tables and tags in the entrée lines identifying each item’s origins.“I think they notice,” said Mary Lou Kearns of the students. She is general manager of Annenberg Dining Hall. The 9,000-square-foot space — topped by hammerbeam trusses and a stenciled ceiling — is so high and vast that it seems to have a sky of its own.Food is an important Earth Day issue, and the dinners bring the Harvard community together, said Martin.“Not everyone understands energy credits or greenhouse gas emissions or global warming,” she said. “But we all understand good food. It’s a starting point for a conversation.”**Before it was time for dinner, it was time to take in some of more than a dozen Earth Day events.At Harvard Medical School (HMS), students watched an April screening of “Home,” a 2009 documentary on the human impact on Earth’s ecosystems. It is a visual celebration of life forms, beginning with single-celled algae. It’s also a warning about nature’s fragility.The night before, medical students watched “Flow,” a 2008 film on Earth’s threatened water resources — a movie some think is scarier than Hollywood horror films. Both film screenings were sponsored by Students for Environmental Awareness in Medicine at HMS.The Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) used Earth Day 2010 to kick off a round of its “Take the Stairs” competition. The idea was for teams to get fit and reduce the use of elevators by competing to climb the stairs-equivalent of Mount McKinley, 20,320 feet.HSPH faculty also sponsored a lecture on air quality and health.At Harvard Business School (HBS), students set up a one-hour sustainability fair on Spangler Lawn. Afterward, there was a lecture on sustainability by Rebecca M. Henderson, the Senator John Heinz Professor of Environmental Management.In 1970, HBS was the scene of an April 22 “environmental teach-in” on the first Earth Day. The theme was “the business of pollution.”This year, HBS so far leads Harvard’s Schools, units, and divisions in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, with a 27 percent decline from fiscal 2006 to 2009.A “green team” from the Graduate School of Design (GSD) used Earth Day to link with Harvard Recycling for a waste audit.Meanwhile, GSD was midway through an international conference sponsored by the School’s Zofnass Program for Infrastructure Sustainability. The conference — three days of panels, lectures, and workshops — was marked by the release of the Zofnass Rating System, a metric for measuring the sustainability of infrastructure and large-scale projects.Design, engineering, and health experts wrangled with the challenges of sustainability issues on this scale. And they asked: If the world is to be sustainable, how can people better plan, design, construct, finance, and operate bridges, roads, rail systems, and other large projects?In the Northwest Science Building, experts from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences shared tips on sustainability practices in laboratory settings. Science labs — with their hardware, fume hoods, and other gear — are notoriously energy-intensive.**At Harvard Law School (HLS), there was a lunchtime Earth Day Fair, consisting of 20 or more tables of vendors, activists, and advocacy groups. Staffers from the Harvard Environmental Law Review were there, along with the Student Animal Legal Defense Fund, Vida Verde (a green cleaning service). There was a table on making your workplace green. (“This could be your office,” read the poster.) There were local vendors of pizza, bread, greens, nuts, even ice cream and pickles.Just before noon, Dean Martha Minow arrived. “This brings back memories,” she said.On April 22, 1970, Minow was a sophomore at New Trier High School near Chicago. She and some classmates walked out of school, placards in hand, to do their part.“Maybe we wore green, I don’t remember,” said Minow. “But we were very proud of taking responsibility for the environment.” Their teachers threatened to mark them absent.Since then, schools and the ideals of Earth Day have formed a bond that is “so tight and so close and so appropriate,” said Minow, speaking to fairgoers from a patch of shade. “Consciousness is the first place, and the most important place, to start.”HLS buildings use 22 percent less energy than four years ago, she said, in part because of a University-wide temperature policy that keeps rooms cooler in winter and warmer in summer. “I now have a series of sweaters and fleeces in my office. I know other people are doing the same thing.”Law school buildings are being built or refurbished to high sustainability standards. Law firms recruiting at HLS are required to limit printed materials and institute other steps to save energy and resources. “We want to be role models,” said Minow. “We want to walk the walk and talk the talk.”The most important thing is the creation of a community around environmental ideals and practices, she said. “We’re going to make a difference here, we’re going to make a difference in educating other people, and therefore we’re going to save the world.”Minow closed with a favorite Native American proverb, which she found in high school: “We do not inherit the Earth from our ancestors. We borrow it from our children.”**A few minutes away, at Byerly Hall at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, some of this year’s fellows gathered in the basement for a buffet lunch.Humaira Shahid, a human rights advocate and journalist from Pakistan, sat down to eat salad, fruit, and vegetarian lasagna. She became aware of Earth Day a few years ago, when her children brought home posters and lessons from school. But Earth Day, by other definitions, she said, has been part of her culture for thousands of years.Pakistan has harvest celebrations for wheat and rice, and Sufi festivals celebrate nature. Basant Day marks the arrival of spring.“Earth [Day] is nothing new,” said Shahid. “It’s new in the West.”last_img read more

Kennedy assails prison shortcomings

first_img On October 22, Anthony Kennedy, Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States, visited Harvard Law School and sat down for a conversation with Dean Martha Minow. <a href=”https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZHbMPnA5n0Q” rel=”nofollow” target=”_blank”> <img src=”https://img.youtube.com/vi/ZHbMPnA5n0Q/0.jpg” alt=”0″ title=”How To Choose The Correct Channel Type For Your Video Content ” /> </a> Without mincing words, U.S. Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy disparaged the American criminal justice system on Thursday for the three prison scourges of long sentences, solitary confinement, and overcrowding.“It’s an ongoing injustice of great proportions,” said Kennedy during a conversation with Harvard Law School (HLS) Dean Martha Minow at Wasserstein Hall, in a room packed mostly with students.Kennedy criticized long prison sentences for the high costs associated with them. (In California, where Kennedy comes from, the cost per prisoner is $35,000 per year, he said.) He also said long sentences have appalling effects on people’s lives.Solitary confinement, he said, “drives men mad.” He called mandatory minimum sentences “terrible” and in need of reform. Sentences in the United States, he said, are eight times longer than sentences in some European countries for equivalent crimes. With more than 1.5 million prisoners in federal, state, and local jails, the United States has the world’s largest prison population.Justice Anthony Kennedy, LL.B. ’61, whose views on the court reflect a preoccupation with liberty and dignity, has often been described as the high court’s swing vote on major issues. But during his talk with Dean Martha Minow, he said he hated to be depicted that way. Photo by Martha StewartThe worst of the matter, he said, is that nobody pays attention to this wrong, not even lawyers. “It’s everybody job to look into it,” he said.Kennedy, LL.B. ’61, whose views on the court reflect a preoccupation with liberty and dignity, has often been described as the high court’s swing vote on major issues. But during his talk with Minow, he said he hated to be depicted that way.“Cases swing. I don’t,” he quipped, as the room erupted in laughter.A moderate conservative, Kennedy has sided with the court’s four liberal justices on social issues. The other four justices tend to be more conservative.Appointed an associate justice on the court by President Ronald Reagan in 1988, Kennedy has written the majority opinion on many of its close decisions, such as in the historic ruling that made same-sex marriage legal across the United States.He also cast the deciding votes in Planned Parenthood v. Casey, which upheld the right to abortion even with new restrictions; Boumediene v. Bush, which extended the writ of habeas corpus to Guantanamo Bay detainees; and Lawrence v. Texas, which struck down the state’s sodomy laws.When a student asked Kennedy what case he would like to be remembered for, he said he didn’t know the answer yet.“I hope time will be a gracious judge,” he said.Displaying a self-deprecating sense of humor, Kennedy said he recalls the cases he studied at HLS better than the cases he has heard as a justice.Explaining how he makes his decisions and writes his opinions, Kennedy said he always asks himself the question: How he can be a good judge every day? The law, he has said, has a moral foundation, and it’s important to ask not only what the law is, but what the law should be.“The law is discipline, ethic, philosophy, and commitment,” he said.In addition to his court duties, Kennedy teaches law abroad, and that experience has been crucial to his views about the importance of the rule of law and the U.S Constitution.“As you move eastward outside the United States, the law becomes more remote and authoritarian,” he said. “In the United States, the law is a promise. If you commit to an ethical course of conduct and be a good citizen, you’ll be free.”In Poland, he was struck by students’ interest in and knowledge of American law. In China, he was bewildered when many students there said they wanted to go to law school.“Many students said they had been influenced by movies,” he said. “I thought they had seen ‘Twelve Angry Men,’ but it was ‘Legally Blonde,’ which I had never heard of. I saw it afterwards. It’s a pretty good movie.”When asked about his favorite professors at HLS, Kennedy mentioned Clark Byse, Ben Kaplan, and Donald Turner. Of the justices he looks up to, he said he admires Earl Warren and Hugo Black.On to getting along with his colleagues on the bench, Kennedy said it’s easy.“As a lawyer, you’re trained to disagree.”Supreme Court Associate Justice Anthony Kennedy visits HLSlast_img read more

Regional Bloc against Transnational Crime

first_imgBy Geraldine Cook/Diálogo July 07, 2017 Central American leaders are looking for specific solutions to eradicate transnational security threats in the Americas. How to confront them? How to set up ‘good networks’? What strategies and mechanisms are needed to fight them? These were some of the questions posed at the Central American Regional Seminar on Countering Transregional-Transnational Threat Networks (T3N), held from June 20th to 22nd in Antigua, Guatemala. Organized by the William J. Perry Center for Hemispheric Defense Studies, the seminar was attended by more than 80 military and security professionals from Belize, Costa Rica, Dominican Republic, El Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, and Panama.Canada, Colombia, Mexico, and the United States attended as observer nations. “We are facing traditional and nontraditional security threats,” said Major General Williams Mansilla Fernández, the Guatemalan minister of Defense, during the opening ceremony. “We have attacks on our cyber security, corruption, money laundering, natural disasters, terrorism, transnational organized crime, gangs, drugs, illegal arms trafficking, and their related problems.” Cyber attacks and the convergence between terrorism and transnational organized crime were analyzed in the dissertations by experts in the field. The agenda also included interagency and regional cooperation, the fostering of inclusiveness in security, and the policies needed to neutralize these security problems. “Without development, there is no security, and without security, there is no development,” Maj. Gen. Mansilla said as he welcomed the 11 nations participating in the seminar. He emphasized that development and security must both be linked to national and regional strategies so that ‘evil networks’ can be destroyed. “Not one country has all the resources necessary to degrade the [threat] networks; the networks are too powerful,” said U.S. Army Lieutenant General Joseph P. DiSalvo, the U.S. Southern Command military deputy commander. “Therefore we have to work together to attack them, one bite at a time. It’s a big elephant out there. You can’t do it all in one effort, you have to get some pieces of the network with the regional approach and eventually you will degrade the network.” The leaders of allied nations in Central America understand that they need allies to defeat the T3Ns. “[We must] study the lessons learned on how other countries confront these threats,” said Dominican Navy Captain Bienvenido Maite, the director of Doctrine and Planning for the Dominican Navy. Those lessons offer them perspectives on how to face their struggle against T3Ns domestically, he explained. Drug trafficking, human trafficking, illegal immigration, and civilian crime are the most widespread security issues on that Caribbean island. Common scourges T3Ns impacts the nations of Central America’s Northern Triangle (Guatemala, Honduras, and El Salvador), participants said. “We have to balance our measures for countering these security threats in our region,” said Honduran Army Colonel José Ramón Munguía Díaz, the academic vice president of the Defense University of Honduras. The Northern Triangle, Col. Munguía indicated, is considered ‘the death triangle’ due to the number of homicides it generates. From 2004 to 2016, nearly 200,000 deaths were recorded in the region. “I’m coming away with some new ideas, a new perspective on what this operational environment is like and how the fight must be waged in the multinational context,” he added. “Being that organized crime is of a transnational nature, the fight against it must also be transnational,” said Guatemalan Air Force Brigadier General Jorge Roberto Ruíz Serovic, the deputy minister of Defense and Planning Policy for the Ministry of Defense. “The budgets that transnational crime has are quite large and often exceed the budgets of the countries themselves,” he added. Brig. Gen. Ruíz indicated, moreover, that his country has several bilateral agreements with the nations of the region for jointly confronting T3Ns. “This allows us to exchange information, training, and mutual aid. Some of us are strong in certain aspects and weak in others, and that’s how we complement each other.” El Salvador has also joined the regional effort against crime. “Criminal organizations are continually changing their modus operandi,” said Salvadoran Army Colonel Raúl Israel Tolentino Sánchez, the chief of staff executive officer of the Special Forces Command. One of the strategies that his country developed for combating T3Ns was the creation of task forces, he said. “We have to come together and make coordinated efforts to develop new strategies for overcoming the enemy,” he said. His call to fight T3Ns was most timely. “It means creating a single regional bloc to combat transnational crime.” New threats “We’re worried about terrorism,” said Belize Defense Force Major Roberto Beltrán, second in command of the Support and Services Battalion. “We know the situation in the Caribbean regarding ‘foreign fighters’ who are coming back from the Middle East. They can get to Belize with their Caribbean passports. Maj. Beltrán underscored Belize’s regional cooperation, in particular, the work they are doing with Mexico. “Mexico is a great ally with which we exchange information and conduct cross-border operations.” Nor has Panama escaped the criminal activities of T3Ns. “Panama is an attractive place for transnational organized crime to penetrate,” said the Panamanian National Police Major Joel Hurtado an advisor to the Technical Secretariat at the Ministry of Public Safety. Consolidating new networks that might share intelligence and information was one of the benefits yielded from the seminar, he said, since T3Ns “has no borders.” Maj. Hurtado called on entities responsible for law enforcement to maintain “communication, cooperation, and the exchange of information,” as these are tools that allow them to more efficiently fight the enemy. After three days of discussions, participants concluded that they will be able to defeat T3Ns only through regional cooperation. “We have to take advantage of the synergy we have with trust and cooperation between our organizations in combating T3Ns,” said Maj. Gen. Mansilla during the closing ceremony. Likewise, he invited participants to confront these threats together and to make maximum use of their institutional resources. “[We must] work in a united way in good networks,” he concluded.last_img read more

Toward a Colombia Free of Anti-personnel Mines

first_imgBy Marian Romero/Diálogo January 09, 2018 Colombia ended 2017 one step closer to its goal of declaring the nation free of anti-personnel mines by 2021. In the final three months of 2017, the Military Forces of Colombia stepped up their demining efforts in the department of Nariño, which borders Ecuador. “In November and December, we found mines that had been planted a couple of weeks before, in anticipation of Colombian Army troops’ advances,” Brigadier General Alberto Tafur García, commander of the Colombian National Army’s Pegasus Task Force (FTP, in Spanish), told Diálogo. “October was an important month because some 45 mines were found, all of them in and around illicit crops. That month, the number of mines in crops increased.” In areas where narcotrafficking persists, service members manually carry out eradication duties to remove illegal crops, while facing anti-personnel mines and other explosive devices. In October 2015, Colombia suspended eradication through aerial spraying of the herbicide glyphosate near the Ecuadorian border and focused instead on uprooting coca bushes in the area. “One of the methods used most by groups devoted to narcotrafficking is to contaminate roadways and illegal crops with anti-personnel mines to slow down the [Colombian] Army’s manual eradication work,” Brig. Gen. Tafur explained. “The number of mines varies by crop, but, in general, three to 10 mines are found in each field.” Coca-growing zone In 2017, FTP neutralized 397 mines in Alto Mira and Frontera, the areas most affected by coca crops in the department of Nariño. The jungle region, one of the least developed parts of the country, is the largest coca-producing area in Colombia. According to the 2017 report of the Integrated Illicit Crops Monitoring System (SIMCI, in Spanish) of the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, coca crops in Nariño increased by 43 percent from 2015 to 2016, with 43,000 hectares planted. The report noted that 39 percent of the coca in Colombia is found in the Pacific coastal region, in the departments of Cauca, Chocó, and Valle del Cauca. “Forced manual eradication consists of getting to the crops and pulling out plants by their roots to die under the sun,” Brig. Gen. Tafur said. “While it may appear simple, this is difficult work that involves extreme danger, with the constant risk of coming across anti-personnel mines recently planted to harm our troops or even the civilian population in that area.” Colombia is the second most heavily mined country in the world, after Afghanistan. According to 2017 figures from Descontamina Colombia, a program under the Administrative Department of the Presidency of the Republic of Colombia, detonations from such devices left 2,276 dead since 2001. Additionally, more than 11,500 cases of people who suffered injuries from unexploded ordinance or anti-personnel mines were recorded. Dual focus The demining work in Colombia is two pronged: neutralize mines the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia planted over five decades of conflict, and clear areas of recently installed mines around coca crops. “Nowadays, terrorist groups use explosive devices to prevent authorities from accessing their sources of financing, such as illegal crop areas, illegal siphons installed on oil pipelines, and illegal mining areas,” said to Diálogo Colonel Jorge Armando Troncoso, assistant director of the National Center for Countering IEDs and Mines (CENAM, in Spanish) of the Colombian National Army. In 2017, CENAM neutralized close to 7,500 explosive devices throughout the country. Of those, 3,673 were anti-personnel mines. Some of the recently planted mines are homemade. Those too can cause great harm—even death. “They’re very simple devices made from any kind of container. They add the explosive, which is made from ammonium nitrate […] mixed with petroleum derivatives. Finally, they install an activation mechanism that can be triggered through strain relief with a taut line or pressure with a syringe,” Col. Troncoso explained. “For the largest explosive devices, there’s an activation method that uses radio frequency.” Although there is significant progress in demining, outlaw groups continue to plant such devices, sometimes coercing the local population. “One method these subversives have been using for some time in Nariño is to deliver anti-personnel mines to farmers who tend to the crops for them to plant them in the areas where Army troops pass through,” Col. Troncoso said. In 2018, the Colombian Army will keep focusing on uprooting coca bushes—an eradication method that keeps the replanting rate to less than 10 percent. The Army will also direct its efforts on the location and neutralization of mines and improvised explosive devices. “In 2018, we will continue to focus on areas where forced manual eradication entails the risk of coming across explosives,” Col. Troncoso concluded. “In Colombia, the real challenge is to keep up with criminals who devise new methods to develop harder-to-detect mines every day.”last_img read more

Hicksville Fatal Hit-and-run Driver Sought

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 75-year-old Westbury man died five days after being struck by a hit-and-run driver in Hicksville last week, Nassau County police said Thursday.Augustine Sebaptiste was walking along West John Street when he was struck from behind by an eastbound vehicle near the corner of Alpha Plaza at 5:40 a.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 28, police said.The victim was taken to Nassau University Medical Center, where died Monday of severe head trauma.The suspect’s vehicle is described as blue and was last seen fleeing toward the Hicksville train station.Second Squad detectives are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information regarding this crime to call Crime Stoppers at 1-800-244-TIPS. All callers will remain anonymous. A $5,000 reward is being offered for information leading to an arrest.last_img read more